Bucy, Darrell, SFC

Quartermaster Corps (Enlisted)
 
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Life Member
 
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Current Service Status
USA Retired
Current/Last Rank
Sergeant First Class
Current/Last Service Branch
Quartermaster Corps
Current/Last Primary MOS
92A-Automated Logistical Specialist
Current/Last MOS Group
Quartermaster Corps (Enlisted)
Primary Unit
1978-1981, 67N20, 173rd Aviation Company (AHC)
Previously Held MOS
67N10-UH-1 Helicopter Repairer
67N20-UH-1 Helicopter Repairer
67N30-UH-1 Team Chief
71P-Flight Operations Coordinator
67Z-Aircraft Maintenance Senior Sergeant
67W-Aircraft Quality Control Supervisor
67N40-UH-1 Helicopter Repairer Supervisor
67T40-UH-60 Helicopter Repairman Supervisor
93P-Aviation Operations Specialist
Service Years
1974 - 2009
Official/Unofficial US Army Certificates
Certificate Of Appreciation
Certificate Of Achievement
Cold War Certificate
Voice Edition

Sergeant First Class


Eleven Service Stripes



 Ribbon Bar

Aviation Badge (Master)
Rifle
Pistol
Machine Gun
 
Quartermaster

 

 Official Badges 

Army Retired-Soldier for Life US Army Retired


 Unofficial Badges 

Army Honorable Discharge (1984-Present) Cold War Medal Cold War Veteran Army Civilian Retired Lapel Pin




 Additional Information
What are you doing now:
I retired from the U.S. Army having served over 34 years in both the Active Army and Army Reserve in April 2009. I then retired from Civil Service employed as a Military Technician, having worked as a UH-1H helicopter mechanic (at the US Army Reserve Aviation Support Facility-Dallas), production controller-aircraft (at USARASF-Dallas and Houston) and as a unit administrator (215th Quartermaster Detachment, Conroe, Texas) in July 2009.  Living in the Rio Grande Valley in Harlingen, Texas.  I'm a member of St. Alban's Episcopal Church and I volunteered at the Harlingen Food Pantry and a Volunteer Profile Assistant with TogetherWeServed.com.  After almost a year volunteering with TWS, I became a contract TWS Administrator, working with all the branches of Together We Served.

Update Jan 5, 2018.  Moved from Harlingen, (in the Rio Grande Valley) Texas to Lufkin, (in deep East) Texas.  We are now just under 3 hours from our farthest kiddo.  We love east Texas and plan that this will be our last move. 
   
Other Comments:
Not Specified
   
 Countries Deployed To or Visited

 Enlisted/Officer Basic Training
  1974, 3rd Battalion, 2nd Training Brigade (Fort Polk, LA ), A/314
 Unit Assignments
U.S. Army124th Maintenance Battalion173rd Aviation Company (AHC)United States Army Aviation Center (USAAVNC)
1st Battalion, 158th Aviation Army Reserve Schools - Staff90th Army Reserve Command (90th ARCOM)373rd Quartermaster Battalion
95th Regiment
  1974-1975, 67N10, (67N) UH-1 Helicopter Repairman Course
  1975-1978, 67N10, F Company, 124th Maintenance Battalion
  1978-1981, 67N20, 173rd Aviation Company (AHC)
  1981-1984, 67N30, 13th Company, 1st Battalion, 1st Aviation Brigade
  1983-1983, 71P, (71P) Flight Operations Coordinator Course
  1984-1989, 67Z, L Company, 1st Battalion, 158th Aviation
  1989-1991, 67W, L Company, 1st Battalion, 158th Aviation
  1990-1990, 67N40, Aviation Accident Prevention Course
  1991-1992, 67T40, 4150th USARF School (Staff)
  1992-1995, 93P, HHC, 90th Army Reserve Command (90th ARCOM)
  1995-1998, 93P, 215th Quartermaster Detachment
  1998-1998, 92A, 9th Battalion (Quartermaster)
  1998-2009, 92A, 215th Quartermaster Detachment
 Combat and Non-Combat Operations
  1979-1979 Wildflecken Training Area (WTA)
  1980-1980 Hohenfels Training Area (HTA)
 Military Association Memberships
United Services Automobile Association (USAA)Post 113Army Together We ServedChapter 84
  1998, United Services Automobile Association (USAA) [Verified] - Assoc. Page
  2010, American Legion, Post 113 (Lufkin, Texas) [Verified] - Chap. Page
  2014, Army Together We Served [Verified]
  2016, Disabled American Veterans (DAV), Chapter 84 (Lufkin, Texas) [Verified] - Chap. Page


 Remembrance Profiles -  84 Soldiers Remembered
  • Abrams, Payton, SP 5
  • Aldridge, Richard, SFC
  • Bucy, Quitman Harris, Pvt, (1942-1943)

Reflections on SFC Bucy's US Army Service
 
 Reflections On My Service
 
PLEASE DESCRIBE WHO OR WHAT INFLUENCED YOUR DECISION TO JOIN THE ARMY.
As a young child, I grew up watching Rat Patrol, Combat, 12 O'Clock High and yes, Gomer Pyle USMC. At that age, I wanted to be in the military. Although they did not talk about it, my father was in the Air Force during the Korean War and my great-grandfather
SFC Darrell Bucy - Please describe who or what influenced your decision to join the Army.
COL Homer C Washburn - Great Grandfather
was in the Army during the Spanish American War, the Border War with Mexico and World War I. He joined as a Private and retired as a Colonel. I was enamored with family stories of his and my father's service. That along with the television shows that I watched as a child seemed to push me towards the military. I had taken the entrance exams first for the Air Force. But when I decided that I was going to join, it was the Army that I chose.

It was the day before I was to leave for basic training that I told my father that I was joining the Army. He did not say a word to me after that. At the time I was hurt and confused as to why he was like that. I left for basic the next day on the bus for Fort Polk and basic training. While at basic training, I was able to see my wife on a few occasions but did not see my folks.

On the day before graduation, I saw my folks car in the parking lot and was able to visit with them a bit that afternoon. My father then was very talkative, asking me all about basic training. You could tell the next day at graduation that he was proud of me. I think when I told him that I was going to join the Army, he was a little jealous that I was joining and that he did not stay in the Air Force. After I was in for a while, when I visited with the family, he and I would exchange "war" stories about our time in service. He seemed happy that I had joined.
WHETHER YOU WERE IN THE SERVICE FOR SEVERAL YEARS OR AS A CAREER, PLEASE DESCRIBE THE DIRECTION OR PATH YOU TOOK. WHAT WAS YOUR REASON FOR LEAVING?
I graduated from high school in 1973. From there I went to work for a mobile home manufacturing plant and worked there a year. I decided at that point that I wanted to join the military. I had taken the entrance exam for the Air Force, but I had decided
SFC Darrell Bucy - Whether you were in the service for several years or as a career, please describe the direction or path you took. What was your reason for leaving?
Darrell Bucy - Basic Training Photo
that I wanted to become a Military Policeman in the Army. I went to the Army Recruiters, and they said that at that moment, they had no openings for MPs. They then asked if I wanted to become a cook, No; Infantry. No: helicopter mechanic? That sounded interesting, so off to Fort Polk, LA for basic training, then off to Ft. Rucker, Alabama for AIT.

Vietnam was winding down at this time. I had a station of choice for Fort Hood, TX, assigned to the 2nd Armored Division Aviation Intermediate Level Maintenance unit (F. Company, 124th Maintenance Battalion). We only had one assigned UH-1H, but we also had 3 OH-58 that were on the property books as float aircraft. I was not a crew chief on flight status, but I was responsible for those 3 aircraft. All of our pilots were qualified on UH1, OH58 and AH1 aircraft that we supported. They had to have so many minimum hours in each type of aircraft each month to stay current, so the 3 58's were quite busy in the evenings and weekends. After about 2 years of that, I moved into the Production Control office as the PC clerk (since I knew how to type).

My next unit (Germany) was the 173rd Assault Helicopter Company (Robin Hoods). The unit had quite the history in Vietnam. When I arrived at the unit, they had just lost all of their gunships (AH1) and had 23 UH1 in three flight platoons. When I first arrived, I was assigned to the Phase Maintenance Team. I spent about 6 months there until they learned that I was in the production control office in my previous unit (again they needed someone that could type). I spent another 6 months there until I was assigned to the 2nd flight platoon. I really enjoyed this assignment. Not only was I averaging about 5 hours a day flight time, but we also flew all over West Germany, Belgium, and the United Kingdom. We flew missions with the Berlin Brigade, German Army, British Army, and the Belgium Army. I saw some very beautiful scenery in Europe, ate some great food, and visited some really historic sites. I'd love to go back there again. Maybe someday I will.

After Germany, I found myself back where I started, Fort Rucker, AL. But this time, I was an instructor in Yano Hall with the Maintenance Training Division (13th Company, 1st Battalion, 1st Aviation Troop Brigade). I was an academic instructor on the UH1, teaching forms and records, hydraulics, flight control systems, and engine starting procedures (at the Officer Training Division). I was also a Water Safety Instructor teaching beginners swimming and advanced lifesaving. I was here for almost 4 years until I ETS'd out of active duty. A student that I had told me about the Military Technician Program, with the Army Reserves. After a lot of thought, I decided to head down that path. About a month before I ETS'd, I had enlisted into the Army Reserves.

I was first assigned as a Platoon Sergeant in the 244th Maintenance Company, which later became L Company, 158th Aviation Regiment, located at NAS Dallas, Texas. I had multiple positions while assigned there; Maintenance Platoon Sergeant, Production Control NCO, and Aircraft Quality Control Supervisor.

From there I returned to being an instructor with the 4150th USAR School. I was teaching UH1 Maintenance again. Phase I was a classroom in the local Reserve Centers. Phase II was during their Annual Training. When they finished AT, they were able to be awarded the MOS. I also taught the MOS Phase (67N) of the Basic Non-Commissioned Officer Course for Army National Guard Students.

I was given an invitation to transfer to the 90th Army Reserve Command (2 Star Command) to work in the Command's Aviation Office in the capacity of the Command Aviation Operations NCO. While it was about a 4-hour drive one way to drill each month, I jumped at the chance to take that position. I lived in Ft. Worth, TX and the command was located in San Antonio, TX. There were two flight facilities with aviation units assigned, one in Dallas, TX and one in Houston (Conroe), TX. I was responsible for oversight of the aviation operations of both facilities and assigned units, and also had input on the maintenance side because of my intensive maintenance background.

In 1995, when there was a structural change between the Army Reserve and the National Guard, the reserve was given the Combat Service Support Units and the National Guard was given the Combat Arms Units. Because of that, the reserve lost most of their aviation assets to the National Guard. They did keep an Attack Squadron, located in Conroe, TX. As a result of this change, and because of the drawdown (BRAC closures), I made what would be my final military unit transfer, as Platoon Sergeant of the 215th Quartermaster Detachment. We had a mission to support the Attack Squadron and the Flight Facility with Class IX aviation repair parts. I was there for 14 years, the last 3 I was acting commander due to no officer being assigned to the unit. I retired from this position in April 2009.
IF YOU PARTICIPATED IN ANY MILITARY OPERATIONS, INCLUDING COMBAT, HUMANITARIAN AND PEACEKEEPING OPERATIONS, PLEASE DESCRIBE THOSE WHICH MADE A LASTING IMPACT ON YOU AND, IF LIFE-CHANGING, IN WHAT WAY?
SFC Darrell Bucy - If you participated in any military operations, including combat, humanitarian and peacekeeping operations, please describe those which made a lasting impact on you and, if life-changing, in what way?
While having never gone downrange into combat, I took my Aircraft Repair Parts Platoon to Kaiserslautern Army Depot, Kaiserslautern, Germany for 3 deployments in direct support of Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom. I had Soldiers working in the Warehouses, Weapons Shops and Maintenance Shops. If not for us, the Soldiers downrange would not get the equipment need to fight the war.

While there, I also visited Soldiers at Landstuhl Regional Medical Center that had come back injured from the war. I wanted them to know that someone was thinking and cared about them. I felt humbled in their presence. I felt like I had done so little, and these brave men and women had given so much.
OF ALL YOUR DUTY STATIONS OR ASSIGNMENTS, WHICH ONE DO YOU HAVE FONDEST MEMORIES OF AND WHY? WHICH WAS YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
SFC Darrell Bucy - Of all your duty stations or assignments, which one do you have fondest memories of and why? Which was your least favorite?
The one thing that I'd most like to do again, fly.
The time that I lived in Hanau Germany, assigned to the 173rd Assault Helicopter Company. I was a UH1 Crew Chief, and I loved all the missions that we had. It was great being able to fly all over Germany and working missions with other governments Army's (Belgium, German, British). The most exciting for me was working with the Berlin Brigade. During those 4 weeks of the mission, I completed what later I found to be the equivalent to the air assault course. Such a great learning experience that was.
FROM YOUR ENTIRE MILITARY SERVICE, DESCRIBE ANY MEMORIES YOU STILL REFLECT BACK ON TO THIS DAY.
While I did not serve in combat, I do have two events that have made an impact on my life.

The first happened during an airshow while I was assigned to the 173 AHC in Germany. While watching Army paratroopers making jumps during the show, something happened to one of the
SFC Darrell Bucy - From your entire military service, describe any memories you still reflect back on to this day.
paratrooper's main shoot and he pulled the secondary shoot. The second shoot got tangled with the first and I watched, along with many others in attendance, the Soldier fall to the ground. He was declared dead at the scene. I've seen many people who have been deceased, but this was the first time that I have witnessed one die right in front of me that should have been preventable.

The second was when I was a Platoon Sergeant in Conroe, TX. It was during one of our annual training exercises and it was drawing down near the end. We were having a platoon party at Lake Belton (Ft Hood, TX) and some of my Soldiers were swimming in an authorized swimming area. I had given them the safety briefings about the dangers of the water and making sure everyone knew how to swim. I was away from the swim area when one of my Soldiers came to me saying that one of my other Soldier's had drowned. There was a Soldier giving her CPR so I got in my truck (before cell phones) and went to the nearest phone and called for Medevac. The helicopter was there within 5 minutes and they took her to the hospital. I'm sorry to say that I lost a Soldier. I've never been to combat and lost a Soldier there, but I understand the feelings of losing one of your own, one that you are responsible for.
WHAT PROFESSIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS ARE YOU MOST PROUD OF FROM YOUR MILITARY CAREER?
SFC Darrell Bucy - What professional achievements are you most proud of from your military career?
Early on in the computer age, but before the Army purchased accounting software that could be used at the company level, I was responsible for assisting in the tracking of the 90th ARCOM's multi-million-dollar flying hour program. I had become very proficient in Lotus 1-2-3 and I built multiple spreadsheets to be able to track all the different accounts within the flying hour program and then produce reports and flowcharts to illustrate how the monies were spent. For this, I received the Meritorious Service Medal.
OF ALL THE MEDALS, AWARDS, FORMAL PRESENTATIONS AND QUALIFICATION BADGES YOU RECEIVED, OR OTHER MEMORABILIA, WHICH ONE IS THE MOST MEANINGFUL TO YOU AND WHY?
SFC Darrell Bucy - Of all the medals, awards, formal presentations and qualification badges you received, or other memorabilia, which one is the most meaningful to you and why?
The highest award that I received was the MSM. You would think that I would hold that one as being the most meaningful. But the one I cherish the most is the Army Achievement Medal. The supervisor that recommended me for this award NEVER submitted anyone for an award but thought the work that I accomplished for him was deserving for a recommendation.
WHICH INDIVIDUAL(S) FROM YOUR TIME IN THE MILITARY STAND OUT AS HAVING THE MOST POSITIVE IMPACT ON YOU AND WHY?
I had three great people to mentor me during the early part of my career. CW4 Bennett (Maintenance Officer), CW3 Pharon (Jim) Enochs (ground maintenance technician), and SFC Robert Hayes (Field First Sergeant) while assigned to F Company, 124th Maintenance Battalion. I thought these folks hung the moon. They thought
SFC Darrell Bucy - Which individual(s) from your time in the military stand out as having the most positive impact on you and why?
enough of me that they had me submit my packet to go to flight school to become an aviation Warrant Officer I submitted my packet at the same time that a friend of mine did. Shortly after submission, I came down on the levy for Germany. After a year in Germany, my friend that put his packet in the same time that I did came to the same unit that I was in, but he was a brand new WO1, UH1 pilot. No one told me that if you had a pending personal action in progress, they would postpone your levy. Since I was already in the country (Germany), I was not selected for flight school.

There were others throughout my career that helped me along the way, but these officers and Senior NCO were very instrumental in the type of NCO that I became.
LIST THE NAMES OF OLD FRIENDS YOU SERVED WITH, AT WHICH LOCATIONS, AND WHAT YOU REMEMBER MOST ABOUT THEM. INDICATE THOSE YOU ARE ALREADY IN TOUCH WITH AND THOSE YOU WOULD LIKE TO MAKE CONTACT WITH.
F Company, 124th Maintenance:

CPT (now COL) David Nedela, Company Cdr - TWS member and I've made contact with him
CW4 Harold Bennett, Maintenance Officer - lost contact with him after I left Ft Rucker in 1980
CW3 Pharon R Enochs, Maintenance Technician - recently contacted, now a retired police LT
SFC Robert Hayes - Last talked to him in the early 1990s. Believe he's still around Ft. Hood
SP5 (Now 1SG) Glen Reeve, lost track of him in the early 1990s. Believe he lives in Oklahoma

173rd Assault Helicopter Company

SP5 Payton Abrams, Avionics Mechanic - lost track when I PCSd from Germany
SFC (now CSM) Larry Shidell, made contact in the early 90s at Ft Hood, lost contact afterward
CW4 Larry Curtis, TWS member and an in contact with him.

13th Company, 1st Battalion, Troop Brigade

SFC Richard Aldridge. Had lost contact when ETSd, but have reconnected within the last year.
CAN YOU RECOUNT A PARTICULAR INCIDENT FROM YOUR SERVICE, WHICH MAY OR MAY NOT HAVE BEEN FUNNY AT THE TIME, BUT STILL MAKES YOU LAUGH?
SFC Darrell Bucy - Can you recount a particular incident from your service, which may or may not have been funny at the time, but still makes you laugh?
There is one that comes to mind. We were working with the Belgium Army. When we went through the chow line the first night we were there, I thought wow, we're eating steak. It was the rawest and nastiest steak that I have ever tasted. I found out later that it was horse meat. They eat horse meat there like we eat beef here. I went for about a week and a half or so, just eating vegetables and I was so ready for some meat, so I tried it again. I have nothing that I could compare the taste too. But when I ordered the meat, I made sure that they cooked the darn thing. That helped some. Funny to me now.
WHAT PROFESSION DID YOU FOLLOW AFTER YOUR MILITARY SERVICE AND WHAT ARE YOU DOING NOW? IF YOU ARE CURRENTLY SERVING, WHAT IS YOUR PRESENT OCCUPATIONAL SPECIALTY?
After leaving active duty in Nov of 1984, I was employed for the next 25 years as a Military Technician. I was first employed at the US Army Reserve Aviation Support Facility (USARASF) - Dallas, located in Grand Prairie, TX. For the first year I was a helicopter mechanic, then
SFC Darrell Bucy - What profession did you follow after your military service and what are you doing now? If you are currently serving, what is your present occupational specialty?
took a pay cut (can you imagine that?) and went to work as a Production Controller - Aircraft. I was in that position until July of 1995 when I transferred to the USARASF - Houston, located in Conroe, Texas, still as a Production Controller - Aircraft.

In 2005, I transferred to the 215th Quartermaster Detachment, located in the same building as the Flight Facility, as the Unit Administrator. There I was the only full time civilian assigned and responsible for administration, finance, training, scheduling of maintenance of unit equipment and unit supply, for a supply platoon that had 53 Soldiers authorized, but maintained almost 70 consistently. I retired from there in July of 2009. After buying back my active duty time for retirement, I retired with almost 35 active federal service years.

I stayed fully retired until Aug of 2015 when I started working for Together We Served as an Administrator, assisting in the management of a website that has in excess of 1,585,000 members.

I retired again in Jan of 2017. I'm enjoying life with my wife and grandkids.
WHAT MILITARY ASSOCIATIONS ARE YOU A MEMBER OF, IF ANY? WHAT SPECIFIC BENEFITS DO YOU DERIVE FROM YOUR MEMBERSHIPS?
SFC Darrell Bucy - What military associations are you a member of, if any? What specific benefits do you derive from your memberships?
I'm a Member for Life of the Harlingen, Texas Post 205 of the American Legion, although I'm not an active member at this time.

I'm also a Lifetime Member of Together We Served. I joined TWS in July 2014 and started as a Volunteer Profile assistant in August 2014. By August of 2015, I had vetted over 12,000 profiles. I was then asked if I would like to join the staff as an Admin Assistant. I said that I would and started that job in August 2015.
IN WHAT WAYS HAS SERVING IN THE MILITARY INFLUENCED THE WAY YOU HAVE APPROACHED YOUR LIFE AND YOUR CAREER? WHAT DO YOU MISS MOST ABOUT YOUR TIME IN THE SERVICE?
SFC Darrell Bucy - In what ways has serving in the military influenced the way you have approached your life and your career? What do you miss most about your time in the service?
It was the Army, my Officers, and senior NCOs, both good and bad, that shaped me into who I am today. I try, in all instances, to live the Army Values of Loyalty, Duty, Respect, Selfless Service, Honor, Integrity, and Personal Courage.
BASED ON YOUR OWN EXPERIENCES, WHAT ADVICE WOULD YOU GIVE TO THOSE WHO HAVE RECENTLY JOINED THE ARMY?
After joining the military, you'll find a camaraderie like no other. You're joining a huge family. You'll have so many around you to learn from, not just how to shoot, dig foxholes, and take the fight to the enemy, but they'll also teach you how to adapt in all areas of your life. Listen to your senior NCO and officers, they will teach you well and guide you straight. I'm so glad that I joined the Army. It's a part of me now, and it will be for you too!
IN WHAT WAYS HAS TOGETHERWESERVED.COM HELPED YOU REMEMBER YOUR MILITARY SERVICE AND THE FRIENDS YOU SERVED WITH.
SFC Darrell Bucy - In what ways has TogetherWeServed.com helped you remember your military service and the friends you served with.
TWS and the US Army
In the time that I've been a member, I have already contacted 4 Soldiers that I served with, and have made a new group of friends that I would have never met if not for Together We Served. It's great to reminisce on my time in the service. I'm retired but wish that I was still in. This helps me keep my service fresh on my mind.

DS 9/16/2019

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