Reese, Benjamin Charles, CW4

Deceased
 
 Photo In Uniform   Service Details
36 kb
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Last Rank
Chief Warrant Officer 4
Last Service Branch
Quartermaster Corps
Last Primary MOS
461A-Airdrop Equipment Repair Technician
Last MOS Group
Ordnance (Officer)
Primary Unit
1965-1969, 761A, HHC, Infantry School, Headquarters Command, Infantry Center, Fort Benning, GA
Service Years
1939 - 1969

Quartermaster Corps

Chief Warrant Officer 4


Four Service Stripes



Six Overseas Service Bars


 Last Photo   Personal Details 

36 kb

Home State
Georgia
Georgia
Year of Birth
1917
 
This Military Service Page was created/owned by MAJ Mark E Cooper to remember Reese, Benjamin Charles (Abn Test Plt), CW4.

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Contact Info
Home Town
Not Specified
Last Address
Columbus, GA

Date of Passing
Mar 19, 2009
 
Location of Interment
Not Specified
Wall/Plot Coordinates
Not Specified

 Official Badges 

Belgian Fourragere Netherlands Orange Lanyard Meritorious Unit Commendation 1944-1961 French Fourragere




 Unofficial Badges 






 Additional Information
Last Known Activity
CW4 (Ret) Benjamin Charles Reese
February 28, 1917 - March 19, 2009
 COLUMBUS, GA  Benjamin Charles Reese, 92, of Columbus, Georgia, beloved husband, father, and grandfather died on March 19, 2009. Mr. Reese died peacefully at Columbus Hospice after a short illness and was surrounded by family. Visitation will take place at Striffler-Hamby Mortuary, Macon Road, on March 24, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. A Memorial Service will be held at 10 a.m. March 25, 2009, at the Airborne Walk at Ft. Benning's Eubanks Field., followed by interment at the Main Post Cemetery. Mr. Reese was born on February 28, 1917 in Early County, Georgia to Charles and Genevieve Reese and grew up in Jakin, Georgia. He graduated from Jakin High School in 1934 and enlisted in the U.S. Army in 1939. Mr. Reese served proudly and with honor as a member of the original Airborne Test Platoon that pioneered U.S. Army airborne operations. His World War II service with the 501st Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division, included combat jumps into Normandy and Holland. Additionally, he served with the 65th Infantry Regiment in the Korean War. Mr. Reese continued serving his nation for more than 30 years, retiring in 1969 as a Chief Warrant Officer Four from the Infantry School at Ft. Benning. His awards include the Bronze Star with Oak Leaf Cluster, Purple Heart, Army Commendation Medal, Combat Infantryman's Badge (2d Award) and Parachutist's Wings with Combat Stars. After retirement from the Army, Mr. Reese served as an instructor at the Military Occupational Specialty Supply/Logistics Course, Ft. Benning for an additional 13 years. He is survived by his loving wife of 66 years, Verne Reese, two sons, Benjamin S. Reese (Yvonne) of Ft. Mitchell and Chaplain (Colonel) David Reese (Alice) currently of Washington, D.C., and three grandchildren, Bill Reese (Kelly) of Atlanta, Amy Dismukes (Derryl) of Columbus, and Caitlin Reese of Franklin Springs, GA. The family would like to give special thanks to Martin Army Community Hospital and the Columbus Hospice House for the extraordinary care given during his final days and to those who came alongside them in prayer. They would also like to thank the members of the 1/507 Parachute Infantry Regiment for providing military honors. In lieu of flowers, the family encourages those who desire to make a contribution in Mr. Reese's name to do so to the charity of their choice.

   
Other Comments:
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Korean War
From Month/Year
June / 1950
To Month/Year
December / 1953

Description
The Korean War; 25 June 1950 – 27 July 1953) began when North Korea invaded South Korea. The United Nations, with the United States as the principal force, came to the aid of South Korea. China came to the aid of North Korea, and the Soviet Union gave some assistance.

Korea was ruled by Japan from 1910 until the closing days of World War II. In August 1945, the Soviet Union declared war on Japan, as a result of an agreement with the United States, and liberated Korea north of the 38th parallel. U.S. forces subsequently moved into the south. By 1948, as a product of the Cold War between the Soviet Union and the United States, Korea was split into two regions, with separate governments. Both governments claimed to be the legitimate government of all of Korea, and neither side accepted the border as permanent. The conflict escalated into open warfare when North Korean forces—supported by the Soviet Union and China—moved into the south on 25 June 1950. On that day, the United Nations Security Council recognized this North Korean act as invasion and called for an immediate ceasefire. On 27 June, the Security Council adopted S/RES/83: Complaint of aggression upon the Republic of Korea and decided the formation and dispatch of the UN Forces in Korea. Twenty-one countries of the United Nations eventually contributed to the UN force, with the United States providing 88% of the UN's military personnel.

After the first two months of the conflict, South Korean forces were on the point of defeat, forced back to the Pusan Perimeter. In September 1950, an amphibious UN counter-offensive was launched at Inchon, and cut off many of the North Korean troops. Those that escaped envelopment and capture were rapidly forced back north all the way to the border with China at the Yalu River, or into the mountainous interior. At this point, in October 1950, Chinese forces crossed the Yalu and entered the war. Chinese intervention triggered a retreat of UN forces which continued until mid-1951.

After these reversals of fortune, which saw Seoul change hands four times, the last two years of conflict became a war of attrition, with the front line close to the 38th parallel. The war in the air, however, was never a stalemate. North Korea was subject to a massive bombing campaign. Jet fighters confronted each other in air-to-air combat for the first time in history, and Soviet pilots covertly flew in defense of their communist allies.

The fighting ended on 27 July 1953, when an armistice was signed. The agreement created the Korean Demilitarized Zone to separate North and South Korea, and allowed the return of prisoners. However, no peace treaty has been signed, and the two Koreas are technically still at war. Periodic clashes, many of which are deadly, have continued to the present.
   
My Participation in This Battle or Operation
From Month/Year
June / 1950
To Month/Year
July / 1953
 
Last Updated:
Mar 16, 2020
   
Personal Memories
   
My Photos From This Battle or Operation
No Available Photos

  846 Also There at This Battle:
  • Ashley, Joshua, SFC, (1950-1970)
  • Atchley, Oren, LTC, (1940-1950)
  • Aylward, William, LTC, (1950-1984)
  • Badger, Thomas Jenkins, COL, (1932-1965)
  • Ballard, Clarence Commodore, CPT, (1941-1950)
  • Barker, William, Sgt, (1950-1951)
  • Barksdale, Thomas Jefferson, Sgt, (1946-1950)
  • Barnes, John, T/Sgt, (1949-1952)
  • Battiste, Alfonza, LTC, (1951-1972)
  • Becker, Jim, S/Sgt, (1948-1952)
  • Beckwith, Charles Robert, SGT, (1946-1955)
  • Beilstein, James, SGT, (1949-1957)
  • Bell, Thomas, PFC, (1950-1952)
  • Block, Kenneth, Cpl
  • Bohmer, Frederick, Sgt, (1950-1953)
  • Brown, M.D., Robert W., CPT, (1952-1953)
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