Beyer, Arthur Otto, Cpl

Deceased
 
 Photo In Uniform   Service Details
47 kb
View Time Line
Last Rank
Corporal
Last Service Branch
Infantry
Last Primary MOS
511-Armorer
Last MOS Group
Infantry (Enlisted)
Primary Unit
1944-1945, 603rd Tank Destroyer Battalion
Service Years
1941 - 1945

Corporal


One Service Stripe



Two Overseas Service Bars


 Last Photo   Personal Details 


Home State
Iowa
Iowa
Year of Birth
1909
 
This Military Service Page was created/owned by the Site Administrator to remember Beyer, Arthur Otto (MOH), Cpl.
 
Contact Info
Home Town
St. Ansgar, Iowa
Last Address
Buffalo, North Dakota

Date of Passing
Feb 16, 1965
 
Location of Interment
Immanuel Lutheran Church Cemetery - St. Ansgar, Iowa
Wall/Plot Coordinates
Unknown

 Official Badges 

Honorably Discharged WW II


 Unofficial Badges 




 Military Association Memberships
Medal of HonorCongressional Medal Of Honor Society
  1945, Medal of Honor [Verified] - Assoc. Page
  1945, Congressional Medal Of Honor Society


 Additional Information
Last Known Activity

World War II Congressional Medal of Honor Recipient. Awarded for action as a Corporal, Co. C, 603rd Tank Destroyer Battalion, US Army, near Arloncourt, Belgium, January 15, 1945. His citation reads: "He displayed conspicuous gallantry in action. His platoon, in which he was a tank-destroyer gunner, was held up by antitank, machinegun, and rifle fire from enemy troops dug in along a ridge about 200 yards to the front. "Noting a machinegun position in this defensive line, he fired upon it with his 76mm gun killing 1 man and silencing the weapon. He dismounted from his vehicle and, under direct enemy observation, crossed open ground to capture the 2 remaining members of the crew. "Another machinegun, about 250 yards to the left, continued to fire on him. Through withering fire, he advanced on the position. Throwing a grenade into the emplacement, he killed 1 crewmember and again captured the 2 survivors. "He was subjected to concentrated smallarms fire but, with great bravery, he worked his way a quarter mile along the ridge, attacking hostile soldiers in their foxholes with his carbine and grenades. When he had completed his self-imposed mission aghainst powerful German forces, he had destroyed 2 machinegun positions, killed 8 of the enemy, and captured 18 prisoners, including 2 bazooka teams. Cpl. Beyer's intrepid action and unflinching determination to close with and destroy the enemy eliminated the German defense line and enabled his task force to gain its objective."

https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/7684529/arthur-otto-beyer

   
Other Comments:
Not Specified
   
 Photo Album   (More...



Ardennes Alsace Campaign (1944-45)/Battle of the Bulge
Start Year
1944
End Year
1945

Description
The Battle of the Bulge (16 December 1944 – 25 January 1945) was a major German offensive campaign launched through the densely forested Ardennes region of Wallonia in Belgium, France and Luxembourg on the Western Front toward the end of World War II in Europe. Hitler planned the offensive with the primary goal to recapture the important harbour of Antwerp. The surprise attack caught the Allied forces completely off guard. United States forces bore the brunt of the attack and incurred the highest casualties for any operation during the war. The battle also severely depleted Germany's war-making resources.

The battle was known by different names. The Germans referred to it as Unternehmen Wacht am Rhein ("Operation Watch on the Rhine"), while the French named it the Bataille des Ardennes ("Battle of the Ardennes"). The Allies called it the Ardennes Counteroffensive. The phrase "Battle of the Bulge" was coined by contemporary press to describe the way the Allied front line bulged inward on wartime news maps and became the best known name for the battle.

The German offensive was supported by several subordinate operations known as Unternehmen Bodenplatte, Greif, and Währung. As well as stopping Allied transport over the channel to the harbor of Antwerp, Germany also hoped these operations would split the British and American Allied line in half, and then proceed to encircle and destroy four Allied armies, forcing the Western Allies to negotiate a peace treaty in the Axis Powers' favor. Once that was accomplished, Hitler could fully concentrate on the eastern theatre of war.

The offensive was planned by the German forces with the utmost secrecy, minimizing radio traffic and moving troops and equipment under cover of darkness. Despite their efforts to keep it secret, the Third U.S. Army's intelligence staff predicted a major German offensive, and Ultra indicated that a "substantial and offensive" operation was expected or "in the wind", although a precise date or point of attack could not be given. Aircraft movement from the Russian Front and transport of forces by rail, both to the Ardennes, was noticed but not acted upon, according to a report later written by Peter Calvocoressi and F. L. Lucas at the codebreaking centre Bletchley Park.

Near-complete surprise was achieved by a combination of Allied overconfidence, preoccupation with Allied offensive plans, and poor aerial reconnaissance. The Germans attacked a weakly defended section of the Allied line, taking advantage of heavily overcast weather conditions, which grounded the Allies' overwhelmingly superior air forces. Fierce resistance on the northern shoulder of the offensive around Elsenborn Ridge and in the south around Bastogne blocked German access to key roads to the northwest and west that they counted on for success; columns that were supposed to advance along parallel routes found themselves on the same roads. This and terrain that favored the defenders threw the German advance behind schedule and allowed the Allies to reinforce the thinly placed troops. Improved weather conditions permitted air attacks on German forces and supply lines, which sealed the failure of the offensive. In the wake of the defeat, many experienced German units were left severely depleted of men and equipment, as survivors retreated to the defenses of the Siegfried Line.

About 610,000 American forces were involved in the battle,[2] and 89,000 were casualties, including 19,000 killed. It was the largest and bloodiest battle fought by the United States in World War II.
   
My Participation in This Battle or Operation
From Year
1945
To Year
1945
 
Last Updated:
Mar 31, 2018
   
Personal Memories
   
My Photos From This Battle or Operation
No Available Photos

  323 Also There at This Battle:
  • Accattato, Rocco, PFC, (1943-1945)
  • Adams, Herbert, Pvt, (1941-1945)
  • Bahlau, Frederick Arthur, 1LT, (1942-1945)
  • Beck, Carl, M/Sgt, (1942-1963)
  • Belan, Elmer, T/5, (1943-1945)
  • Boehme, Karen
  • Bolio, Robert, Cpl, (1943-1945)
  • Bouck, Lyle Joseph, 1LT, (1940-1945)
  • Brenzel, Frank, T/4, (1944-1946)
  • Burch, Gilbert, T/5, (1944-1946)
  • Burford, Chris
  • Burns, Henry, PFC, (1941-1944)
  • Bush, William Douglas, 1LT, (1942-1951)
  • Chase, George, Sgt, (1943-1945)
  • Cole, Chauncey David, LTC, (1938-1960)
  • Costanzo, Anthony, PFC, (1942-1945)
  • Dallas, Frank J., LTC, (1942-1970)
  • Davol, Rupert
  • Deitz, Wallace, MSG, (1944-1968)
  • Dobozy Jr, Steve, PFC, (1943-1945)
  • Domino, Anthony, Cpl, (1942-1945)
  • Dukic, Jacqueline
  • Eatman, Harold Lee, 1st Sgt, (1942-1945)
Copyright Togetherweserved.com Inc 2003-2011