Bertoldo, Vito Rocco, M/Sgt

Deceased
 
 Photo In Uniform   Service Details
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Last Rank
Master Sergeant
Last Service Branch
Infantry
Last Primary MOS
566-Duty NCO
Last MOS Group
Infantry (Enlisted)
Primary Unit
1941-1945, 566, 42nd Infantry Division
Service Years
1941 - 1945

Master Sergeant


One Service Stripe



Two Overseas Service Bars


 Last Photo   Personal Details 


Home State
Georgia
Georgia
Year of Birth
1916
 
This Military Service Page was created/owned by the Site Administrator to remember Bertoldo, Vito Rocco (MOH), M/Sgt.
 
Contact Info
Home Town
Decatur, Georgia
Last Address
San Jose, California

Date of Passing
Jul 23, 1966
 
Location of Interment
Golden Gate National Cemetery - San Bruno, California
Wall/Plot Coordinates
Section C, Grave 52-A

 Official Badges 

Honorably Discharged WW II


 Unofficial Badges 




 Military Association Memberships
Medal of HonorCongressional Medal Of Honor Society
  1945, Medal of Honor [Verified] - Assoc. Page
  1945, Congressional Medal Of Honor Society


 Additional Information
Last Known Activity

World War II Congressional Medal of Honor Recipient. He served during World War II in the United States Army as a Master Sergeant in Company A, 242nd Infantry, 42nd Infantry Division and was awarded the Medal of Honor for his bravery at Hatten, France, on January 9 and 10, 1945. His citation reads "He fought with extreme gallantry while guarding 2 command posts against the assault of powerful infantry and armored forces which had overrun the battalion's main line of resistance. On the close approach of enemy soldiers, he left the protection of the building he defended and set up his gun in the street, there to remain for almost 12 hours driving back attacks while in full view of his adversaries and completely exposed to 88-mm, machine gun and small-arms fire. He moved back inside the command post, strapped his machine gun to a table and covered the main approach to the building by firing through a window, remaining steadfast even in the face of 88-mm. fire from tanks only 75 yards away. One shell blasted him across the room, but he returned to his weapon. When 2 enemy personnel carriers led by a tank moved toward his position, he calmly waited for the troops to dismount and then, with the tank firing directly at him, leaned out of the window and mowed down the entire group of more than 20 Germans. Some time later, removal of the command post to another building was ordered. M/Sgt. Bertoldo voluntarily remained behind, covering the withdrawal of his comrades and maintaining his stand all night. In the morning he carried his machine gun to an adjacent building used as the command post of another battalion and began a day-long defense of that position. He broke up a heavy attack, launched by a self-propelled 88-mm. gun covered by a tank and about 15 infantrymen. Soon afterward another 88-mm. weapon moved up to within a few feet of his position, and, placing the muzzle of its gun almost inside the building, fired into the room, knocking him down and seriously wounding others. An American bazooka team set the German weapon afire, and M/Sgt. Bertoldo went back to his machine gun dazed as he was and killed several of the hostile troops as they attempted to withdraw. It was decided to evacuate the command post under the cover of darkness, but before the plan could be put into operation the enemy began an intensive assault supported by fire from their tanks and heavy guns. Disregarding the devastating barrage, he remained at his post and hurled white phosphorous grenades into the advancing enemy troops until they broke and retreated. A tank less than 50 yards away fired at his stronghold, destroyed the machine gun and blew him across the room again but he once more returned to the bitter fight and, with a rifle, single-handedly covered the withdrawal of his fellow soldiers when the post was finally abandoned. With inspiring bravery and intrepidity M/Sgt. Bertoldo withstood the attack of vastly superior forces for more than 48 hours without rest or relief, time after time escaping death only by the slightest margin while killing at least 40 hostile soldiers and wounding many more during his grim battle against the enemy hordes".

https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/22973/vito-rocco-bertoldo

   
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WWII - European-African-Middle Eastern Theater
Start Year
1942
End Year
1945

Description
The European-Mediterranean-Middle East Theater was a major theater of operations during the Second World War (between December 7, 1941, and March 2, 1946). The vast size of Europe, Mediterranean and Middle East theatre saw interconnected naval, land, and air campaigns fought for control of the Mediterranean, North Africa, the Horn of Africa, the Middle East, and Europe. The fighting in this theatre lasted from 10 June 1940, when Italy entered the war on the side of Germany, until 2 May 1945 when all Axis forces in Italy surrendered. However, fighting would continue in Greece – where British troops had been dispatched to aid the Greek government – during the early stages of the Greek Civil War.

The British referred to this theatre as the Mediterranean and Middle East Theatre (so called due to the location of the fighting and the name of the headquarters that controlled the initial fighting: Middle East Command) while the Americans called the theatre of operations the Mediterranean Theatre of War. The German official history of the fighting is dubbed 'The Mediterranean, South-East Europe, and North Africa 1939–1942'. Regardless of the size of the theatre, the various campaigns were not seen as neatly separated areas of operations but part of one vast theatre of war.

Fascist Italy aimed to carve out a new Roman Empire, while British forces aimed initially to retain the status quo. Italy launched various attacks around the Mediterranean, which were largely unsuccessful. With the introduction of German forces, Yugoslavia and Greece were overrun. Allied and Axis forces engaged in back and forth fighting across North Africa, with Axis interference in the Middle East causing fighting to spread there. With confidence high from early gains, German forces planned elaborate attacks to be launched to capture the Middle East and then to possibly attack the southern border of the Soviet Union. However, following three years of fighting, Axis forces were defeated in North Africa and their interference in the Middle East was halted. Allied forces then commenced an invasion of Southern Europe, resulting in the Italians switching sides and deposing Mussolini. A prolonged battle for Italy took place, and as the strategic situation changed in southeast Europe, British troops returned to Greece.

The theatre of war, the longest during the Second World War, resulted in the destruction of the Italian Empire and altered the strategic position of Germany resulting in numerous German divisions being deployed to Africa and Italy and total losses (including those captured upon final surrender) being over half a million. Italian losses, in the theatre, amount to around to 177,000 men with a further several hundred thousand captured during the process of the various campaigns. British losses amount to over 300,000 men killed, wounded, or captured, and total American losses in the region amounted to 130,000.
   
My Participation in This Battle or Operation
From Year
1945
To Year
1945
 
Last Updated:
Mar 31, 2018
   
Personal Memories
   
My Photos From This Battle or Operation
No Available Photos

  812 Also There at This Battle:
  • Adams, Edward Everett, CPT, (1943-1946)
  • Albright, Frank Phidias, 1LT, (1942-1946)
  • Anderson, Harry Vernon, MAJ, (1942-1947)
  • Apgar, Horace Vincent, T/Sgt, (1942-1946)
  • Appel, William B., S/Sgt, (1942-1946)
  • Armijo, Jose Dolores, PFC, (1942-1946)
  • Armstrong, Robert Gelston, S/Sgt, (1942-1946)
  • Barancik, Richard, LTC, (1942-1950)
  • Barter, Charles Tracey, MAJ, (1940-1951)
  • Baum, Abraham, MAJ, (1940-1946)
  • Bencowitz, Isaac, CPT, (1917-1945)
  • Bleecker, Paul O., PFC, (1942-1945)
  • Boardman, Edward Thorpe, 1LT, (1943-1946)
  • Bonelli, Anthony, T/5, (1943-1945)
  • Bonilla y Norat, Felix José, 1LT, (1942-1945)
  • Born, Lester Kruger, MAJ, (1942-1946)
  • Boruch, Edward J., T/5, (1942-1945)
  • Brenzel, Frank, T/4, (1944-1946)
  • Brown, Garfield, Cpl, (1942-1946)
  • Brown, John Nicholas, LTC, (1918-1946)
  • Burke, Edward, Sgt, (1942-1945)
  • Burks, Barnard DeWitt, CPT, (1942-1946)
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