Cobb, Albert L., Jr., Pvt

Fallen
 
 Photo In Uniform   Service Details
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Last Rank
Private
Last Service Branch
Infantry
Last Primary MOS
745-Rifleman
Last MOS Group
Infantry (Enlisted)
Primary Unit
1943-1944, 745, 101st Airborne Division
Service Years
1940 - 1944

Private


One Service Stripe



One Overseas Service Bar


 Last Photo   Personal Details 


Home State
Georgia
Georgia
Year of Birth
1922
 
This Military Service Page was created/owned by Sgt. S. Kimbrow to remember Cobb, Albert L., Jr., Pvt.

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Casualty Info
Home Town
Savannah
Last Address
Chatham County, Georgia.

Casualty Date
Jun 06, 1944
 
Cause
Hostile, Died
Reason
Multiple Fragmentation Wounds
Location
France
Conflict
WWII - European Theater of Operations/Normandy Campaign (1944)
Location of Interment
American Cemetery - Normandy, France
Wall/Plot Coordinates
lot E Row 5 Grave 8

 Official Badges 




 Unofficial Badges 




 Military Associations and Other Affiliations
World War II FallenD-Day Fallen
  1944, World War II Fallen [Verified]
  1944, D-Day Fallen



WWII - European Theater of Operations/Normandy Campaign (1944)/Operation Overlord/D-Day Airborne Landings
From Month/Year
June / 1944
To Month/Year
June / 1944

Description

The American airborne landings in Normandy were the first United States combat operations during Operation Overlord, the invasion of Normandy by the Western Allies on June 6, 1944. Around 13,100 paratroopers of the U.S. 82nd Airborne and 101st Airborne Divisions made night parachute drops early on D-Day, June 6, followed by 3,937 glider troops flown in by day. As the opening maneuver of Operation Neptune (the assault operation for Overlord) the American airborne divisions were delivered to the continent in two parachute and six glider missions.

Both divisions were part of the U.S. VII Corps and provided it support in its mission of capturing Cherbourg as soon as possible to provide the Allies with a port of supply. The specific missions of the airborne divisions were to block approaches into the vicinity of the amphibious landing at Utah Beach, to capture causeway exits off the beaches, and to establish crossings over the Douve River at Carentan to assist the U.S. V Corps in merging the two American beachheads.

The assault did not succeed in blocking the approaches to Utah for three days. Numerous factors played a part, most of which dealt with excessive scattering of the drops. Despite this, German forces were unable to exploit the chaos. Many German units made a tenacious defense of their strong-points, but all were systematically defeated within the week.

 

   
My Participation in This Battle or Operation
From Month/Year
June / 1944
To Month/Year
June / 1944
 
Last Updated:
Mar 16, 2020
   
Personal Memories
   
My Photos From This Battle or Operation
No Available Photos

  51 Also There at This Battle:
 
  • Bald Eagle, David William, Sgt, (1936-1944)
  • Cooter, Walter, PFC, (1942-1944)
  • Eatman, Harold Lee, 1st Sgt, (1942-1945)
  • Joint, Edward, PFC, (1942-1945)
  • Ronan, Leo, (1942-1945)
  • Singlaub, John Kirk, MG, (1943-1978)
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