Anderson, John, T/Sgt

Deceased
 
 Photo In Uniform   Service Details
View Time Line
Last Rank
Technical Sergeant
Last Service Branch
Medical Corps
Primary Unit
1901-1902, HHC, 1st Battalion, 19th Infantry
Service Years
1898 - 1919

Technical Sergeant


Six Service Stripes


 Last Photo   Personal Details 


Home State
Indiana
Indiana
Year of Birth
1875
 
This Military Service Page was created/owned by SSG Justin Davis to remember Anderson, John, T/Sgt.

If you knew or served with this Soldier and have additional information or photos to support this Page, please leave a message for the Page Administrator(s) HERE.
 
Contact Info
Home Town
Fowler
Last Address
Not Specified

Date of Passing
Jul 24, 1949
 
Location of Interment
Not Specified
Wall/Plot Coordinates
Not Specified

 Official Badges 

US Army Retired (Pre-2007) World War I Victory Button World War I Honorable Discharge Chevron


 Unofficial Badges 






 Additional Information
Last Known Activity
T/SGT JOHN ANDERSON BORN IN DENMARK 31 JULY 1875
SERVICE:
31 MAY 1898 - 29 APR 1899; COMPANY "C", 5TH CAVALRY REGT, PHILIPPINE ISLANDS, PVT
19 MAY 1899 - 24 JUN 1902; 23RD INFANTRY REGT & COMPANY "G" 19TH INFANTRY REGT, ANGEL ISLAND, CALIFORNIA, PVT
30 JUL 1902 - 29 JUL 1911; HOSPITAL CORP, FT BRADY, MICHIGAN; HAVANA, CUBA; FT RENO, OKLAHOMA, SGT
30 JUL 1911 - 29 JUL 1914; HOSPITAL CORP, S/SGT
30 JUL 1914 - 17 OCT 1919; AMBULANCE COMPANY #5, 2ND MEDICAL REGIMENT, FT SAM HOUSTON, TEXAS, T/SGT

PASSED 24 JULY 1949 IN INDIANA LAID TO REST AT FOWLER CEMETERY, BENTON COUNTY, INDIANA.

 
   
Other Comments:
Not Specified
   


Philippine - American War
From Month/Year
January / 1899
To Month/Year
December / 1902

Description
The Philippine–American War (Spanish: Guerra Filipino-Estadounidense, Filipino: Digmaang Pilipino-Amerikano) (1899–1902) was an armed conflict between the First Philippine Republic (Spanish: República Filipina) and the United States.

The conflict arose when First Philippine Republic objected to the terms of the Treaty of Paris under which the United States took possession of the Philippines from Spain ending the Spanish–American War. The war was a continuation of the Philippine struggle for independence that began in 1896 with the Philippine Revolution.

Fighting erupted between United States and the Philippine Republic forces on February 4, 1899, and quickly escalated into the 1899 Second Battle of Manila. On June 2, 1899, the First Philippine Republic officially declared war against the United States. The war officially ended on July 2, 1902, with a victory for the United States. However, some Philippine groups led by veterans of the Katipunan continued to battle the American forces. Among those leaders was General Macario Sacay, a veteran Katipunan member who assumed the presidency of the proclaimed "Tagalog Republic", formed in 1902 after the capture of President Emilio Aguinaldo. Other groups, including the Moro people and Pulahanes people, continued hostilities in remote areas and islands until their final defeat a decade later at the Battle of Bud Bagsak on June 15, 1913.

The war and occupation by the U.S. would change the cultural landscape of the islands, as people dealt with an estimated 34,000 to 220,000 Philippine casualties (with more civilians dying from disease and hunger brought about by war), disestablishment of the Roman Catholic Church in the Philippines (as a "state Church" – as previously in Spain), and the introduction of the English language in the islands as the primary language of government, education, business, industrial and increasingly in future decades among families and educated individuals.

Under the 1902 "Philippine Organic Act", passed by the United States Congress, Filipinos were initially given very limited self-government, including the right to vote for some elected officials such as an elected Philippine Assembly, but it was not until 14 years later with the 1916 Philippine Autonomy Act, (or "Jones Act") passed by the United States Congress, during the administration of Democratic 28th President, Woodrow Wilson, that the U.S. officially promised eventual independence, along with more Philippine control in the meantime over the Philippines. The 1934 Philippine Independence Act created in the following year the Commonwealth of the Philippines, a limited form of independence, and established a process ending in Philippine independence (originally scheduled for 1944, but interrupted and delayed by World War II). Finally in 1946, following World War II and the Japanese Occupation of the Philippines, the United States granted independence through the Treaty of Manila concluded between the two governments and nations.
   
My Participation in This Battle or Operation
From Month/Year
January / 1899
To Month/Year
December / 1901
 
Last Updated:
Mar 16, 2020
   
Personal Memories
   
Units Participated in Operation

1st Battalion, 18th Infantry Regiment

 
My Photos From This Battle or Operation
No Available Photos

  71 Also There at This Battle:
 
  • Alexander, Upton, 1st Sgt, (1898-1933)
  • Amsler, Samuel, 1ST SGT, (1883-1908)
  • Barth, Christ (Christoph), CSgt, (1887-1910)
  • Beazley, Harry Leslie, SGT, (1898-1917)
  • Beckwith, Edward (SS), MAJ, (1895-1925)
  • Faison, Samson Lane, BG, (1883-1922)
  • Horton, Francis, MG, (1897-1943)
  • Hunt, Irvin Leland, COL, (1895-1933)
  • Leach, Michael, 2LT, (1880-1919)
  • Lewis, Edward Mann, MG, (1881-1928)
  • Merriam (CMoH), Henry, MGEN, (1862-1901)
  • Morey, Dana Woods, COL, (1898-1938)
  • Shinkle, Edward, BG, (1901-1942)
  • Smith, Walter D., BG, (1901-1946)
  • Spaulding, Oliver, BG, (1898-1946)
Copyright Togetherweserved.com Inc 2003-2011