Weart, Douglas Lafayette, MG

Deceased
 
 Photo In Uniform   Service Details
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Last Rank
Major General
Last Service Branch
Engineer Corps
Last Primary MOS
00GC-Commanding General
Last MOS Group
General Officer
Primary Unit
1945-1951, US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE)
Service Years
1915 - 1951

Engineer Corps

Major General



Three Overseas Service Bars


 Last Photo   Personal Details 


Home State
Illinois
Illinois
Year of Birth
1891
 
This Military Service Page was created/owned by the Site Administrator to remember Weart, Douglas Lafayette, MG USA(Ret).
 
Contact Info
Home Town
Chicago, Illinois
Last Address
Washington, DC

Date of Passing
Apr 05, 1975
 
Location of Interment
Arlington National Cemetery - Arlington, Virginia
Wall/Plot Coordinates
Plot: Section 11, Site 24-2

 Official Badges 

US Army Retired (Pre-2007)


 Unofficial Badges 






 Additional Information
Last Known Activity
http://www.generals.dk/general/Weart/Douglas_Lafayette/USA.html

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=59969241

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_class_the_stars_fell_on
   
Other Comments:
Not Specified
   
 Photo Album   (More...



WWII - China-Burma-India Theater/China Defensive Campaign (1942-45)
From Month/Year
July / 1942
To Month/Year
May / 1945

Description
(China Defensive Campaign 4 July 1942 to 4 May 1945) The China Theater of Operations more resembled the Soviet-German war on the Eastern Front than the war in the Pacific or the war in Western Europe. On the Asian continent, as on the Eastern Front, an Allied partner, China, carried the brunt of the fighting. China had been at war with Japan since 1937 and continued the fight until the Japanese surrender in 1945. The United States advised and supported China's ground war, while basing only a few of its own units in China for operations against Japanese forces in the region and Japan itself. The primary American goal was to keep the Chinese actively in the Allied war camp, thereby tying down Japanese forces that otherwise might be deployed against the Allies fighting in the Pacific.

The United States confronted two fundamental challenges in the China theater. The first challenge was political. Despite facing a common foe in Japan, Chinese society was polarized. Some Chinese were supporters of the Nationalist Kuomintang government; some supported one of the numerous former warlords nominally loyal to the Nationalists; and some supported the Communists, who were engaged in a guerrilla war against the military and political forces of the Nationalists. Continuing tensions, which sometimes broke out into pitched battles, precluded development of a truly unified Chinese war effort against the Japanese.

The second challenge in the China theater was logistical. Fighting a two-front war of its own, simultaneously having to supply other Allies, and facing enormous distances involved in moving anything from the United States to China, the U.S. military could not sustain the logistics effort required to build a modern Chinese army. Without sufficient arms, ammunition, and equipment, let alone doctrine and leadership training, the Chinese Nationalist Army was incapable of driving out the Japanese invaders. A "Europe-first" U.S. policy automatically lowered the priority of China for U.S.-manufactured arms behind the needs of U.S. forces, of other European Allies, and of the Soviet Union. The China theater was also the most remote from the United States. American supplies and equipment had to endure long sea passages to India for transshipment to China, primarily by airlift. But transports bringing supplies to China had to fly over the Himalayas the so-called Hump, whose treacherous air currents and rugged

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mountains claimed the lives of many American air crews. Despite a backbreaking effort, only a fraction of the supplies necessary to successfully wage a war ever reached southern China.

Regardless of these handicaps, the United States and Nationalist China succeeded in forging a coalition that withstood the tests of time. Indeed, Chinese leader Generalissimo Chiang Kai-shek, the Allied Supreme Commander, China Theater, accepted, though reluctantly, U.S. Army generals as his chiefs of staff. This command relationship also endured differences in national war aims and cultures, as well as personalities, until the end of the war. The original policies of President Franklin D. Roosevelt and Army Chief of Staff George C. Marshall succeeded, China stayed in the war and prevented sizable numbers of Japanese troops from deploying to the Pacific.
   
My Participation in This Battle or Operation
From Month/Year
January / 1944
To Month/Year
May / 1945
 
Last Updated:
Mar 16, 2020
   
Personal Memories
   
My Photos From This Battle or Operation
No Available Photos

  36 Also There at This Battle:
 
  • Maddocks, Ray, MG, (1917-1951)
  • Middleton, John, BG, (1918-1954)
  • Timberman, Thomas, MG, (1923-1960)
  • Young, Phillip, 1LT, (1942-1945)
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