Ambro, Jerome, Jr., Sgt

Deceased
 
 Photo In Uniform   Service Details
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Last Rank
Sergeant
Last Service Branch
Military Police Corps
Last Primary MOS
1677-Military Police Supervisor
Last MOS Group
Military Police Corps (Enlisted)
Primary Unit
1951-1953, 8th Army, Korea (EUSA)
Service Years
1951 - 1953

Sergeant


One Service Stripe



Six Overseas Service Bars


 Last Photo   Personal Details 

92 kb

Home State
New York
New York
Year of Birth
1928
 
This Military Service Page was created/owned by LTC Roger Gaines to remember Ambro, Jerome, Jr., Sgt.

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Contact Info
Home Town
Brooklyn
Last Address
Not Specified

Date of Passing
Mar 04, 1993
 
Location of Interment
Arlington National Cemetery - Arlington, Virginia
Wall/Plot Coordinates
Not Specified

 Official Badges 

Army Military Police


 Unofficial Badges 




 Military Association Memberships
Korean War Fallen
  2013, Korean War Fallen


 Additional Information
Last Known Activity
Representative from New York; born in Brooklyn, Kings County, N.Y., June 27, 1928; attended Brooklyn public elementary schools; graduated, Grover Cleveland High School, Queens, N.Y., 1946; B.A., New York University, 1955; served in the United States Army, Military Police, 1951-1953; budget officer, purchasing and personnel director, Town of Huntington, N.Y., 1960-1967; served on Suffolk County (N.Y.) Board of Supervisors,  1968-1969;  elected to four terms as Supervisor, Town of Huntington, N.Y., 1968-1974; chairman, Huntington Urban Renewal Agency and president, Freeholders and Commonalty of the Town of Huntington, 1968-1974; elected as a Democrat to the Ninety-fourth, Ninety-fifth and Ninety-sixth Congresses (January 3, 1975-January 3, 1981); unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1980 to the Ninety-seventh Congress; governmental and legislative consultant, 1981 to present; He died at Alexandria, Virginia, on March 4, 1993 and was buried in Arlington National Cemetery.
   
Other Comments:

Jerome Anthony Ambro, Jr. (June 27, 1928 – March 4, 1993) was a member of the United States House of Representatives from 1975 - 1981.


Born in Brooklyn, New York, he attended Brooklyn public elementary schools and graduated from Grover Cleveland High School, Queens, New York in 1946. Ambro earned a B.A. from New York University in 1955.


He served in the United States Army as a member of the Military Police from 1951-1953 where he attained the rank of sergeant. He served the town of Huntington as a budget office and purchasing and personnel director from 1960 - 1967. Later, served on the Suffolk County, New York Board of Supervisors from 1968 - 1969. From 1968-1974 he was served four terms as Supervisor for the town of Huntington, New York. He was simultaneously chairman of Huntington's Urban Renewal Agency, as well as president of Freeholders and Commonalty of the Town of Huntington, New York.


In 1970, he challenged Basil Paterson for the Democratic nomination for Lieutenant Governor of New York, but was defeated in the primary election.


He was elected as a Democrat to the 94th, 95th and 96th United States Congresses, and served from January 3, 1975, to January 3, 1981. After leaving Congress, Ambro worked as a lobbyist.


Ambro led the Democratic Party to its first sweep of Huntington elections in 35 years. While Ambro was in office, the town of Huntington became the first municipality to ban the use of the pesticide DDT.


During his first term in the House, Ambro was elected president of his 82-member freshman class. Ambro served on the Public Works and Transportation Committee, and was elected chairman of the House Science and Technology Committee Subcommittee on Natural Resources and the Environment. Ambro played a major role in winning the preservation of wetlands in Massapequa, New York, and having Brookhaven National Laboratory designated as the site of a high-energy reactor.


In 1980, Ambro authored an amendment to the Marine Protection, Research, and Sanctuaries Act (Section 106(f)) to require that the disposal of dredged material into Long Island Sound from any federal project, or from any non-federal project exceeding 25,000 cubic yards (19,000 m³), comply with the environmental criteria for ocean dumping under the MPRSA, in addition to the requirements of Section 404 of the Clean Water Act.


Ambro died at Alexandria, Virginia on March 4, 1993. He is buried in Arlington National Cemetery.


The East Northport, New York post office building was renamed the Jerome Anthony Ambro, Jr. Post Office Building in 1998. The Town of Huntington named the Jerome Ambro Memorial Wetlands Preserve in honor of Ambro's conservation efforts.


   
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Korean War/UN Summer-Fall Offensive (1951)
Start Year
1951
End Year
1951

Description
On 23 June 1951 Jacob Malik, Deputy Foreign Minister of the U.S.S.R., made a statement in a recorded broadcast in New York implying Chinese and North Korean willingness to discuss armistice terms to end the Korean War. When Communist China indicated that it also desired peace, President Truman authorized General Ridgway to arrange for an armistice conference with the North Korean commander. Both aides agreed to begin negotiations at Kaesong on 10 July 1951. The chief delegate for the U.N. at the conference was Vice Admiral C. Turner Joy. The enemy delegation was led by Lt. Gen. Nam Il.

It was agreed at the first meeting that military operations would continue until an armistice agreement was signed. However, neither aide was willing to start any large-scale offensive while peace talks were in progress. U.N. military action in this period was limited to combat patrolling, artillery and air bombardment, and the repulsing of enemy attacks.

In August of 1951 the strength of all U.N. ground forces under Eighth Army command totaled 549,224. This included 248,320 U.S. ground troops, Army and Marines, 268,320 in the ROK Army, and 32,874 in the ground units of the seventeen other United Nations.

Truce negotiations were broken off by the Communists on 22 August. Van Fleet then launched a series of limited-objective attacks to improve the Eighth Army's defensive positions. The U.S. X and ROK I Corps in east-central Korea fought for terrain objectives five to seven miles above Line KANSAS, among them Bloody and Heartbreak Ridges, to drive enemy forces from positions that favored an attack on Line KANSAS. By the last week in October these objectives had been secured.

Along the western portion of the front, action in September was characterized by local attacks, counterattacks, and combat patrols. By 12 October five divisions of the I Corps had advanced the front three to four miles to a new Line JAMESTOWN to protect the Ch'orwon-Seoul railroad. The IX Corps followed with aggressive patrolling toward Kumsong. On 21 October it seized the commanding heights just south of the city.

On 25 October armistice negotiations were resumed at the new site of Panmunjom.
 
   
My Participation in This Battle or Operation
From Year
1951
To Year
1951
 
Last Updated:
Dec 16, 2013
   
Personal Memories
   
Units Participated in Operation

1st Cavalry Division (Unit of Action)

 
My Photos From This Battle or Operation
No Available Photos

  421 Also There at This Battle:
  • Adomaitis, Antonas, T/Sgt, (1951-1953)
  • Borchik, Melvin, Sgt, (1951-1953)
  • DE CASAS, GEORGE, PFC, (1951-1954)
  • Farrington, Allen, Cpl, (1952-1954)
  • Guidry, Lester, Sgt, (1947-1951)
  • Hanna, Robert, SFC, (1951-1952)
  • Herbert, Anthony, LTC, (1947-1972)
  • Kimbrough, David, Jr., Cpl, (1950-1951)
  • Linton, Elton, Sgt, (1948-1952)
  • Martin, Joseph, 1SG, (1946-1967)
  • McQuerry, Charles, CSM, (1943-1983)
  • Middlemas, John, MAJ, (1935-1966)
  • Miyamura, Hiroshi, S/Sgt, (1944-1953)
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