Pershing, John, GEN

Deceased
 
 Photo In Uniform   Service Details
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Last Rank
General
Last Service Branch
Cavalry
Primary Unit
1895-1899, 10th Cavalry Regiment, 2nd Brigade (Horse) 1st Cavalry Division
Service Years
1886 - 1924

Cavalry

General



Eleven Overseas Service Bars


 Last Photo   Personal Details 

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Home State
Missouri
Missouri
Year of Birth
1860
 
This Military Service Page was created/owned by SP 4 Steven Ryan (LoneWolf) to remember Pershing, John (Black Jack), GEN.

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Contact Info
Home Town
Not Specified
Last Address
Laclede

Date of Passing
Jul 15, 1948
 
Location of Interment
Not Specified
Wall/Plot Coordinates
Not Specified

 Official Badges 

Army Staff Identification


 Unofficial Badges 




 Military Association Memberships
The Army and Navy Union USA
  1919, The Army and Navy Union USA - Assoc. Page


 Additional Information
Last Known Activity






Brigadier General, U.S. Army
Commander
Date of Action: June 15, 1913
Citation:
The Distinguished Service Cross is presented to John J. Pershing, Brigadier General, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in action against hostile fanatical Moros at Mount Bagsak, Jolo, Philippine Islands, on June 15, 1913. Brigadier General Pershing personally assumed command of the assaulting line at the most critical period when only about 15 yards from the last Moro position. His encouragement and splendid example of personal heroism resulted in a general advance and the prompt capture of the hostile stronghold.

   
Other Comments:



John Joseph "Black Jack" Pershing, GCB (September 13, 1860July 15, 1948) was an officer in the United States Army. Pershing is the only person to be promoted in his own lifetime to the highest rank ever held in the United States ArmyGeneral of the Armies (George Washington was granted this posthumously). Pershing led the American Expeditionary Force in World War I and was regarded as a mentor by the generation of American generals who led the United States Army in Europe during World War II, including George C. Marshall, Dwight D. Eisenhower, Omar Bradley and George S. Patton.

GENERAL OF THE ARMIES

No one currently holds this rank, and it has never been used by an active duty Army officer at the same time as General of the Army, so it is not entirely clear how the two ranks would legally compare to each other. 

Three star Lieutenant Generals and four star Generals were reauthorized temporarily during World War I.
Tasker H. Bliss and John J. Pershing were promoted to General in October 1917, and Peyton C. March was promoted in May 1918. Hunter Liggett and Robert Lee Bullard were promoted to Lieutenant General on October 16, 1918. On September 3, 1919 Pub.L. 66-45 granted Pershing the rank of "General of the Armies" in recognition of his performance as the commander of the American Expeditionary Force. After the war, in 1920, the Lieutenant Generals and Generals reverted to their permanent ranks of Major General[1], except for Pershing. Pershing retired from the United States Army on September 13, 1924, and retained his rank of General of the Armies of the United States until his death in 1948.[2] Pershing wore four gold stars during his tenure as General of the Armies. Four star Generals were reauthorized in 1929, starting with Charles Pelot Summerall, and five star Generals of the Army were created in 1944. Pershing was deemed senior to both of those ranks, but it remains unclear as to if General of the Armies was considered a five or six star rank.

Six Star Rank

 Insignia

 

General Pershing was offered the option to create his own insignia for the position General of the Armies. He chose to continue to wear the four stars of a General, but in gold, instead of the four silver stars used by a regular general. Army Regulations 600-35, Personnel: The Prescribed Uniform, October 12, 1921, and all subsequent editions during General Pershing's lifetime, made no mention of insignia for General of the Armies but prescribed that generals would wear four stars.

On December 14, 1944, when the rank of General of the Army was established, Army Regulations 600-35 were changed to prescribe that Generals of the Army would wear five silver stars. General Pershing continued to wear only four gold stars, but he remained preeminent among all Army personnel until his death in 1948.

Conjectural Design for General of the Armies
 
Conjectural Design for General of the Armies

In 1945, the Institute of Heraldry prepared a conjectural insignia which would have incorporated a sixth star into the five-star design of General of the Army. As no proposal to appoint a new General of the Armies was ever firmly developed, the United States Army has never officially approved a six-star general insignia

Seniority

During World War II the United States Army established the five-star rank of General of the Army. By order of seniority, it was decided that General Pershing (still living when the rank of General of the Army was created in 1944) would be senior to all the newly appointed General of the Army officers. The then Secretary of War, Henry L. Stimson was asked whether Pershing was therefore a six-star general. Stimson stated:

It appears the intent of the Army was to make the General of the Armies senior in grade to the General of the Army. I have advised Congress that the War Department concurs in such proposed action.

Official Army regulations do not presently declare General of the Armies as a six star rank; however, some military historians and enthusiasts alike have interpreted General Pershing's seniority to five-star generals to mean that General of the Armies is a six-star rank.  However, it could alternatively be said that General of the Armies is a five-star rank, and Pershing's seniority is merely a result of the fact that he achieved his rank earlier than the other five-star generals.

However, it has been speculated that if the United States ever created a six-star rank, it might be called General of the Armies

 

 

   
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Mexican Service Campaign (1911-1919)
Start Year
1911
End Year
1919

Description
The Mexican Service Medal is an award of the United States military which was established by General Orders of the United States War Department on December 12, 1917. The Mexican Service Medal recognizes those service members who performed military service against Mexican forces between the dates of April 12, 1911 and June 16, 1919.

To be awarded the Mexican Service Medal, a service member was required to perform military duty during the time period of eligibility and in one of the following military engagements.

    Veracruz Expedition: April 21 to November 23, 1914
    Punitive Expedition into Mexico: March 14, 1916 to February 7, 1917
    Buena Vista, Mexico: December 1, 1917
    San Bernardino Canyon, Mexico: December 26, 1917
    La Grulla, Texas: January 8 – January 9, 1918
    Pilares, Chihuahua: March 28, 1918
    Nogales, Arizona: November 1–26, 1915, or August 27, 1918
    El Paso, Texas and Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua: June 15 – June 16, 1919

The United States Navy issued the Mexican Service Medal to members of the Navy and Marines who participated in any of the above actions, as well as to service members who served aboard U.S. naval vessels patrolling Mexican waters between April 21 and November 26, 1914, or between March 14, 1916, and February 7, 1917.

The Mexican Service Medal was also awarded to any service member who was wounded or killed while participating in action any against hostile Mexican forces between April 12, 1911 and February 7, 1917.

Although a single decoration, both the Army and Navy issued two different versions of the Mexican Service Medal. The Army Mexican Service Medal displayed an engraving of a yucca plant, while the Navy version depicts the San Juan de Ulúa fortress in Veracruz harbor. Both medals displayed the annotation "1911 - 1917" on the bottom of the medal.

The Mexican Service Medal was a one time decoration and there were no service stars authorized for those who had participated in multiple engagements. For those Army members who had been cited for gallantry in combat, the Citation Star was authorized as a device to the Mexican Service Medal. There were no devices authorized for the Navy's version of the decoration.

A similar decoration, known as the Mexican Border Service Medal also existed for those who had performed support duty to Mexican combat expeditions from within the United States.
   
My Participation in This Battle or Operation
From Year
1911
To Year
1919
 
Last Updated:
Aug 6, 2008
   
Personal Memories
   
My Photos From This Battle or Operation
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  266 Also There at This Battle:
  • Bass, Harry Wesley, 1LT, (1917-1919)
  • Baylor, Bernard, MAJ, (1911-1953)
  • Beightler, Robert Sprague, MG, (1911-1953)
  • Dargue, Herbert Arthur, MG, (1911-1941)
  • Fink, Thomas Jefferson, M/Sgt, (1893-1921)
  • Gaul, Joseph Albert, Sgt, (1914-1920)
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