Murray, Maxwell, MG

Deceased
 
 Photo In Uniform   Service Details
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Last Rank
Major General
Last Service Branch
US
Last Primary MOS
00GC-Commanding General
Last MOS Group
General Officer
Primary Unit
1943-1945, Western Defense Command
Service Years
1907 - 1946

US

Major General



Five Overseas Service Bars


 Last Photo   Personal Details 

68 kb

Home State
New York
New York
Year of Birth
1885
 
This Military Service Page was created/owned by the Site Administrator to remember Murray, Maxwell, MG USA(Ret).
 
Contact Info
Home Town
West Point
Last Address
Washington, DC

Date of Passing
Aug 04, 1948
 
Location of Interment
Arlington National Cemetery - Arlington, Virginia
Wall/Plot Coordinates
Not Specified

 Official Badges 

Army Staff Identification US Army Retired (Pre-2007) Meritorious Unit Commendation 1944-1961 French Fourragere

US Army Retired


 Unofficial Badges 

Armor Shoulder Cord Artillery Shoulder Cord




 Additional Information
Last Known Activity
MG Murray was the 1st commander of Camp Bragg, North Carolina.
Murray was born at West Point, New York, the son of General Arthur Murray and Sarah Wetmore de Russy.

From October 1, 1941-May 1942 Major General Maxwell Murray served as the first commander of the newly formed 25th Infantry Division, Schofield Barracks, Hawaii. The 25th Infantry Division operated for only ten weeks in peace before the Japanese launched their surprise attack on Pearl Harbor, December 7, 1941. 


MG Murray retired in 1946, and died two years later.
   
Other Comments:
Not Specified
   
 Photo Album   (More...



WWII - Asiatic-Pacific Theater/Surrender of Japan
Start Year
1945
End Year
1945

Description
The surrender of the Empire of Japan on September 2, 1945, brought the hostilities of World War II to a close. By the end of July 1945, the Imperial Japanese Navy was incapable of conducting major operations and an Allied invasion of Japan was imminent. While publicly stating their intent to fight on to the bitter end, Japan's leaders, (the Supreme Council for the Direction of the War, also known as the "Big Six"), were privately making entreaties to the neutral Soviet Union to mediate peace on terms more favorable to the Japanese. Meanwhile, the Soviets were preparing to attack Japanese forces in Manchuria and Korea in fulfillment of promises they had secretly made to the United States and the United Kingdom at the Tehran and Yalta Conferences.

On August 6, 1945, the United States dropped an atomic bomb on the Japanese city of Hiroshima. Late in the evening of August 8, 1945, in accordance with the Yalta agreements, but in violation of the Soviet–Japanese Neutrality Pact, the Soviet Union declared war on Japan, and soon after midnight on August 9, 1945, the Soviet Union invaded the Imperial Japanese puppet state of Manchukuo. Later that same day, the United States dropped a second atomic bomb, this time on the Japanese city of Nagasaki. The combined shock of these events caused Emperor Hirohito to intervene and order the Supreme Council for the Direction of the War to accept the terms the Allies had set down in the Potsdam Declaration for ending the war. After several more days of behind-the-scenes negotiations and a failed coup d'état, Emperor Hirohito gave a recorded radio address across the Empire on August 15. In the radio address, called the Gyokuon-huis ("Jewel Voice Broadcast"), he announced the surrender of Japan to the Allies.

On August 28, the occupation of Japan by the Supreme Commander for the Allied Powers began. The surrender ceremony was held on September 2, aboard the United States Navy battleship USS Missouri (BB-63), at which officials from the Japanese government signed the Japanese Instrument of Surrender, thereby ending the hostilities. Allied civilians and military personnel alike celebrated V-J Day, the end of the war; however, some isolated soldiers and personnel from Imperial Japan's far-flung forces throughout Asia and the Pacific islands refused to surrender for months and years afterwards, some even refusing into the 1970s. The role of the atomic bombings in Japan's surrender, and the ethics of the two attacks, is still debated. The state of war between Japan and the Allies formally ended when the Treaty of San Francisco came into force on April 28, 1952. Four more years passed before Japan and the Soviet Union signed the Soviet–Japanese Joint Declaration of 1956, which formally brought an end to their state of war.
   
My Participation in This Battle or Operation
From Year
1945
To Year
1945
 
Last Updated:
Jul 23, 2014
   
Personal Memories
   
My Photos From This Battle or Operation
No Available Photos

  94 Also There at This Battle:
 
  • Healy, Michael D., MG, (1945-1981)
  • LaVictor, Alan
  • Lawn, John
  • Miller, Richard J., PFC, (1943-1945)
  • Miller, Richard, PFC, (1943-1946)
  • Ross, Charles G., LTC, (1942-1972)
  • Ruvolo, Peter PFC, (1944-1946)
  • Singlaub, John Kirk, MG, (1943-1978)
  • Soma, Nils, T/5, (1943-1945)
  • Sturgill, Dale Franklin, T/3, (1943-1946)
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