Murray, Maxwell, MG

Deceased
 
 Photo In Uniform   Service Details
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Last Rank
Major General
Last Service Branch
US
Last Primary MOS
00GC-Commanding General
Last MOS Group
General Officer
Primary Unit
1943-1945, Western Defense Command
Service Years
1907 - 1946

US

Major General



Five Overseas Service Bars


 Last Photo   Personal Details 

68 kb

Home State
New York
New York
Year of Birth
1885
 
This Military Service Page was created/owned by the Site Administrator to remember Murray, Maxwell, MG USA(Ret).
 
Contact Info
Home Town
West Point
Last Address
Washington, DC

Date of Passing
Aug 04, 1948
 
Location of Interment
Arlington National Cemetery - Arlington, Virginia
Wall/Plot Coordinates
Not Specified

 Official Badges 

Army Staff Identification US Army Retired (Pre-2007) Meritorious Unit Commendation 1944-1961 French Fourragere

US Army Retired


 Unofficial Badges 

Armor Shoulder Cord Artillery Shoulder Cord




 Additional Information
Last Known Activity
MG Murray was the 1st commander of Camp Bragg, North Carolina.
Murray was born at West Point, New York, the son of General Arthur Murray and Sarah Wetmore de Russy.

From October 1, 1941-May 1942 Major General Maxwell Murray served as the first commander of the newly formed 25th Infantry Division, Schofield Barracks, Hawaii. The 25th Infantry Division operated for only ten weeks in peace before the Japanese launched their surprise attack on Pearl Harbor, December 7, 1941. 


MG Murray retired in 1946, and died two years later.
   
Other Comments:
Not Specified
   
 Photo Album   (More...



Central Pacific Campaign (1941-43)/Attack on Pearl Harbor 7 December 1941
Start Year
1941
End Year
1941

Description
The attack on Pearl Harbor was a surprise military strike conducted by the Imperial Japanese Navy against the United States naval base at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, on the morning of December 7, 1941 (December 8 in Japan). The attack led to the United States' entry into World War II.

The attack was intended as a preventive action in order to keep the U.S. Pacific Fleet from interfering with military actions the Empire of Japan was planning in Southeast Asia against overseas territories of the United Kingdom, the Netherlands, and the United States. There were simultaneous Japanese attacks on the U.S.-held Philippines and on the British Empire in Malaya, Singapore, and Hong Kong.

From the standpoint of the defenders, the attack commenced at 7:48 a.m. Hawaiian Time. The base was attacked by 353 Japanese fighters, bombers and torpedo planes in two waves, launched from six aircraft carriers. All eight U.S. Navy battleships were damaged, with four being sunk. All but one were later raised, and six of the eight battleships were returned to service and went on to fight in the war. The Japanese also sank or damaged three cruisers, three destroyers, an anti-aircraft training ship, and one minelayer. 188 U.S. aircraft were destroyed; 2,403 Americans were killed and 1,178 others were wounded. Important base installations such as the power station, shipyard, maintenance, and fuel and torpedo storage facilities, as well as the submarine piers and headquarters building (also home of the intelligence section) were not attacked. Japanese losses were light: 29 aircraft and five midget submarines lost, and 65 servicemen killed or wounded. One Japanese sailor was captured.

The attack came as a profound shock to the American people and led directly to the American entry into World War II in both the Pacific and European theaters. The following day (December 8), the United States declared war on Japan. Domestic support for non-interventionism, which had been strong, disappeared. Clandestine support of Britain (e.g., the Neutrality Patrol) was replaced by active alliance. Subsequent operations by the U.S. prompted Germany and Italy to declare war on the U.S. on December 11, which was reciprocated by the U.S. the same day.

Years later several writers alleged that parties high in the U.S. and British governments knew of the attack in advance and may have let it happen (or even encouraged it) with the aim of bringing America into war. However, this Pearl Harbor advance-knowledge conspiracy theory is rejected by mainstream historians.

There were numerous historical precedents for unannounced military action by Japan. However, the lack of any formal warning, particularly while negotiations were still apparently ongoing, led President Franklin D. Roosevelt to proclaim December 7, 1941, "a date which will live in infamy".

Due to the fact the attack happened without a declaration of war and without explicit warning, the attack on Pearl Harbor was judged by the Tokyo Trials to be a Japanese war crime.
   
My Participation in This Battle or Operation
From Year
1941
To Year
1941
 
Last Updated:
Nov 25, 2012
   
Personal Memories
   
My Photos From This Battle or Operation
No Available Photos

  196 Also There at This Battle:
  • Badger, Thomas Jenkins, COL, (1932-1965)
  • Barker, John, S/Sgt, (1940-1945)
  • Barthelmess, Karl T., LTC, (1940-1944)
  • Belhumeur, Julien, Sgt, (1940-1953)
  • Cawood, Claude, Sgt
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