Gamlin, Adolph, Pvt

Deceased
 
 Photo In Uniform   Service Details
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Last Rank
Private
Last Service Branch
Infantry
Primary Unit
1901-1901, 1st Battalion, 9th Infantry Regiment/HHC
Service Years
1900 - 1901

Private



Two Overseas Service Bars


 Last Photo   Personal Details 

41 kb

Home State
Nebraska
Nebraska
Year of Birth
1878
 
This Military Service Page was created/owned by SP 4 Johnny Conroy to remember Gamlin, Adolph, Pvt.

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Contact Info
Home Town
otoe
Last Address
810 N. 10
Nebraska City,
Otoe, Nebraska

Date of Passing
Dec 19, 1969
 
Location of Interment
Not Specified
Wall/Plot Coordinates
Not Specified

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 Additional Information
Last Known Activity

The Balangiga Incident, September 28, 1901. An attack on COmpany C, 9th Infantry regiment, just returned from combat in China (Boxer Rebellion) by 500 disguised Filipinos.

"To mask the disappearance of the women from the dawn service inside the church, 34 attackers from Barrio Lawaan cross-dressed as women worshippers.

"At 6:45 a.m., on Saturday, September 28, Abanador grabbed Pvt.  Adolph Gamlin's rifle from behind and hit him unconscious with its butt.  Abanador turned the rifle at the men in the sergeant’s mess tent, wounding one. He then waved a rattan cane above his head, and yelled: “Atake, mga Balangigan-on! (Attack, men of Balangiga!). A bell in the church tower was rung seconds later, to announce that the attack had begun.

"The guards outside the convent and municipal hall were killed. The Filipinos apparently sealed in the Sibley tents at the front of the municipal hall, having had weapons smuggled to them in water carriers, broke free and entered the municipal hall and made their way to the second floor. The men in the church broke into the convent through a connecting corridor and killed the officers who were billeted there. The mess tent and the two barracks were attacked. Most of the Americans were hacked to death before they could grab their firearms. The few who escaped the main attack fought with kitchen utensils, steak knives, and chairs.

"The convent was successfully occupied and so, initially, was the municipal hall, but the mess tent and barracks attack suffered a fatal flaw - about one hundred men were split into three groups, one of each target but too few attackers had been assigned to ensure success. A number of Co. C. personnel escaped from the mess tent and the barracks and were able to retake the municipal hall, arm themselves and fight back. Adolph Gamlin recovered consciousness, found a rifle and caused considerable casualties among the Filipinos. [Gamlin died at age 92 in the U.S. in 1969].

"Faced with immensely superior firepower and a rapidly degrading attack, Abanador ordered a retreat. But with insufficient numbers and fear that the rebels would re-group and attack again, the surviving Americans, led by Sgt.  Frank Betron, escaped by baroto (native canoes with outriggers, navigated by using wooden paddles) to Basey, Samar, about 20 miles away. The townspeople returned to bury their dead, then abandoned the town."

Capt. Edwin V. Bookmiller, West Point Class 1889 and commander of Company G of the 9th US Infantry at Basey, commandeered a civilian coastal steamer from Tacloban, the SS Pittsburg, and with his men steamed to Balangiga. The town was deserted. The dead of Company C lay where they fell, many bearing horrible hack wounds. Bookmiller and his men burned the town to the ground.

Of the original 74 man contingent, 48 died and 26 survived, 22 of them severely wounded. The dead included all of  Company C's commissioned officers: Capt. Thomas W. Connell (RIGHT), 1st Lt. Edward A. Bumpus, and Maj. Richard S. Griswold (the Company surgeon). The guerillas also took 100 rifles with 25,000 rounds of ammunition; 28 Filipinos died and 22 were wounded.

   
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Moro Rebellion (Philippines)
Start Year
1899
End Year
1913

Description
The Moro Rebellion (1899–1913) was an armed conflict between Moro indigenous ethnic groups and the United States military which took place in the southern Philippines but was unconnected to the Spanish–American War in 1898.

The word "Moro" is a term for ethnic Muslims who lived in the Southern Philippines, an area that includes Mindanao Jolo and the neighboring Sulu Archipelago.

After the American government informed the Moros that they would continue the old protectorate relationship that they had with Spain, the Moro Sulu Sultan rejected this and demanded that a new treaty be negotiated. The United States signed the Bates Treaty with the Moro Sulu Sultanate which guaranteed the Sultanate's autonomy in its internal affairs and governance while America dealt with its foreign relations, in order to keep the Moros out of the Philippine–American War. Once the Americans subdued the northern Filipinos, the Bates Treaty with the Moros was violated by the Americans and they invaded Moroland.

After the war in 1915, the Americans imposed the Carpenter Treaty on Sulu.
   
My Participation in This Battle or Operation
From Year
1901
To Year
1901
 
Last Updated:
Nov 24, 2012
   
Personal Memories
   
My Photos From This Battle or Operation
No Available Photos

  145 Also There at This Battle:
  • Cain, John Valentine, BN SGT MAJ, (1887-1912)
  • Fink, Thomas Jefferson, M/Sgt, (1893-1921)
  • Hunt, Irvin Leland, COL, (1895-1933)
  • Lewis, Edward Mann, MG, (1881-1928)
  • Luberoff, George, BG, (1898-1944)
  • McCain, William, BG, (1902-1942)
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