Middleton, Martin, COL

Deceased
 
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Last Rank
Colonel
Last Service Branch
Infantry
Last Primary MOS
1542-Infantry Unit Commander
Last MOS Group
Infantry (Officer)
Primary Unit
1942-1945, 82nd Airborne Division/HHC
Service Years
1941 -

Infantry

Colonel



Four Overseas Service Bars


 Last Photo   Personal Details 


Home State
Illinois
Illinois
Year of Birth
Not Specified
 
This Military Service Page was created/owned by SGT Barry Simpson to remember Middleton, Martin, COL.

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Contact Info
Home Town
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Last Address
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Date of Passing
Not Specified
 
Location of Interment
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Wall/Plot Coordinates
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 Official Badges 

Belgian Fourragere Netherlands Orange Lanyard


 Unofficial Badges 






 Additional Information
Last Known Activity
Not Specified
   
Other Comments:
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Naples-Foggia Campaign (1943-44)/Volturno Line
Start Year
1943
End Year
1943

Description
The Volturno Line (also known as the Viktor Line) was a German defensive position in Italy during World War II. The line ran from Termoli in the east, along the Biferno River through the Apennine Mountains to the Volturno River in the west. BEFORE DAWN ON THE MORNING OF 13 OCTOBER 1943, American and British assault troops of the Fifth Army waded the rain-swollen Volturno River in the face of withering fire from German riflemen and machine gunners dug in along the northern bank. Water-soaked and chilled to the bone, our troops fought their way through enemy machine-gun pits and fox holes to establish a firm bridgehead. This crossing of the Volturno opened the second phase of the Allied campaign in Italy. Five weeks earlier the Fifth Army had landed on the hostile beaches of the Gulf of Salerno. Now it was attacking a well-defended river line. Along the Volturno the Germans had entrenched themselves in the first good defensive position north of Naples. At Salerno they had fought for each foot of sand and counterattacked repeatedly, but after our beachhead was secure, they had carried out an orderly withdrawal. Under pressure from the Fifth Army, commanded by Lt. Gen. Mark W. Clark, their rearguards had relinquished the great port of Naples with its surrounding airfields, providing us with the base necessary for large-scale operations west of the rugged Apennine mountain range, backbone of the Italian peninsula. East of the Apennines the British Eighth Army, under General (now Field Marshal) Sir Bernard L. Montgomery, had reached the mouth of the Biferno River during the first week of October. The Eighth and Fifth Armies now held a line across the peninsula running south from Torre Petacciato on the Adriatic Sea for some sixty-five miles, then west to a point on the Tyrrhenian Sea just south of the Volturno. Along this line of rivers and mountains the Germans clearly intended to make a stubborn stand, hoping to delay, perhaps to stop the northward advance.
   
My Participation in This Battle or Operation
From Year
1943
To Year
1943
 
Last Updated:
Sep 23, 2011
   
Personal Memories
   
My Photos From This Battle or Operation
No Available Photos

  13 Also There at This Battle:
 
  • Bernholz, Charles H., T/5, (1942-1945)
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