Plotts, Robert Lee, I, CSM

Deceased
 
 Photo In Uniform   Service Details
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Last Rank
Command Sergeant Major
Last Service Branch
Infantry
Last Primary MOS
00Z-Command Sergeant Major IN
Last MOS Group
Infantry (Enlisted)
Primary Unit
1971-1972, 11Z50, HHC, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne)
Service Years
1942 - 1972
Foreign Language(s)
Romanian
Vietnamese
Russian


Special Forces
Command Sergeant Major


Eight Service Stripes



Thirteen Overseas Service Bars


 Last Photo   Personal Details 

12 kb

Home State
Nebraska
Nebraska
Year of Birth
1926
 
This Military Service Page was created/owned by MAJ Mark E Cooper to remember Plotts, Robert Lee, I, CSM.

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Contact Info
Home Town
Fairbury
Last Address
Linden, NC

Date of Passing
Nov 14, 2009
 
Location of Interment
Not Specified
Wall/Plot Coordinates
Not Specified

 Official Badges 

Infantry Shoulder Cord US Army Retired (Pre-2007) Special Forces Group


 Unofficial Badges 






 Additional Information
Last Known Activity
CSM Robert L. Plotts I

LINDEN - Retired U.S. Army Command Sgt. Maj. Robert Lee Plotts I, 83, of 7085 Plotts Drive, went home to be with the Lord, on Saturday, Nov. 14, 2009, in Cape Fear Valley Medical Center in Fayetteville. He was born on June 13, 1926, to the late Myrtle Galloway Plotts and Leon T. Plotts, in Detroit. Mr. Plotts served our country for 26 years during World War II and the Korean and Vietnam wars, receiving a Purple Heart, the Bronze Star and also the Army Commendation Medal. He also served in the occupation of Laos and the Bay of Pigs. The first part of his military career he spent in the 504th Infantry Regiment and the 82nd Airborne Division. The final and longest part of his career he spent in the respected division, Special Forces. He was part of the 77th, 10th, 1st, 5th, 6th and 7th Special Forces Groups. He was preceded in death by a son, Robert Lee Plotts II; and a daughter, Emma Marian Hales. He is survived by his wife of 59 years, Mildred R. Plotts of the home; a son Johnny Plotts of Linden; a granddaughter, Becky Hales; and a grandson Bobby Plotts, both of Linden; two great-grandsons, Tommy Hales of the home, and Robby Plotts of Virginia Beach, Va.; a great-granddaughter, Taylor Polston of Fayetteville; four half sisters, Angie Plotts of Detroit, and Susan Plotts, Mary Lou Plotts and Judy Plotts, all of Michigan; four half brothers, Charles Plotts, Jack Plotts, Jerry Plotts and Larry Plotts, all of Michigan. The family will receive friends from 7 to 9 tonight, Wednesday, Nov. 18, 2009, at Rogers and Breece Funeral Home in Fayetteville. Funeral services will be conducted at 2 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 19, 2009, at St. Andrews United Methodist Church, with Dr. Gerry Davis officiating. He will be laid to rest in St. Andrews United Methodist Church cemetery with the rendering of full military honors. In lieu of flowers, the family suggests that memorial contributions be made to St. Andrews United Methodist Church Building Fund, 121 Lofton Drive, Fayetteville, NC 28311-3426. Pallbearers: Dan Pietz, Gordon McRae, Steve McGraw, Ed Norris, Craig Morris, Mark Tomeucci, Ricky Knight and Bobby Salmon. Honorary: Faith Lessons Sunday school class, Hardees Liars Club and Dr. Godfrey Ohadugha. Services entrusted to Rogers and Breece Funeral Home of Fayetteville.

   
Other Comments:
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 Photo Album   (More...



Korean War
Start Year
1950
End Year
1953

Description
The Korean War; 25 June 1950 – 27 July 1953) began when North Korea invaded South Korea. The United Nations, with the United States as the principal force, came to the aid of South Korea. China came to the aid of North Korea, and the Soviet Union gave some assistance.

Korea was ruled by Japan from 1910 until the closing days of World War II. In August 1945, the Soviet Union declared war on Japan, as a result of an agreement with the United States, and liberated Korea north of the 38th parallel. U.S. forces subsequently moved into the south. By 1948, as a product of the Cold War between the Soviet Union and the United States, Korea was split into two regions, with separate governments. Both governments claimed to be the legitimate government of all of Korea, and neither side accepted the border as permanent. The conflict escalated into open warfare when North Korean forces—supported by the Soviet Union and China—moved into the south on 25 June 1950. On that day, the United Nations Security Council recognized this North Korean act as invasion and called for an immediate ceasefire. On 27 June, the Security Council adopted S/RES/83: Complaint of aggression upon the Republic of Korea and decided the formation and dispatch of the UN Forces in Korea. Twenty-one countries of the United Nations eventually contributed to the UN force, with the United States providing 88% of the UN's military personnel.

After the first two months of the conflict, South Korean forces were on the point of defeat, forced back to the Pusan Perimeter. In September 1950, an amphibious UN counter-offensive was launched at Inchon, and cut off many of the North Korean troops. Those that escaped envelopment and capture were rapidly forced back north all the way to the border with China at the Yalu River, or into the mountainous interior. At this point, in October 1950, Chinese forces crossed the Yalu and entered the war. Chinese intervention triggered a retreat of UN forces which continued until mid-1951.

After these reversals of fortune, which saw Seoul change hands four times, the last two years of conflict became a war of attrition, with the front line close to the 38th parallel. The war in the air, however, was never a stalemate. North Korea was subject to a massive bombing campaign. Jet fighters confronted each other in air-to-air combat for the first time in history, and Soviet pilots covertly flew in defense of their communist allies.

The fighting ended on 27 July 1953, when an armistice was signed. The agreement created the Korean Demilitarized Zone to separate North and South Korea, and allowed the return of prisoners. However, no peace treaty has been signed, and the two Koreas are technically still at war. Periodic clashes, many of which are deadly, have continued to the present.
   
My Participation in This Battle or Operation
From Year
1952
To Year
1953
 
Last Updated:
Nov 18, 2009
   
Personal Memories
   
My Photos From This Battle or Operation
No Available Photos

  676 Also There at This Battle:
  • Ashley, Joshua, SFC, (1950-1970)
  • Atchley, Oren, LTC, (1940-1950)
  • Aylward, William, LTC, (1950-1984)
  • Badger, Thomas Jenkins, COL, (1932-1965)
  • Barksdale, Thomas Jefferson, Sgt, (1946-1950)
  • Barnes, John, T/Sgt, (1949-1952)
  • Battiste, Alfonza, LTC, (1951-1972)
  • Becker, Jim, S/Sgt, (1948-1952)
  • Beckwith, Charles Robert, SGT, (1946-1955)
  • Block, Kenneth, Cpl
  • Bohmer, Frederick, Sgt, (1950-1953)
  • Bridges, Shelton, SFC, (1938-1968)
  • Brown, M.D., Robert W., CPT, (1952-1953)
  • Burns, Robert, LTC, (1943-1972)
  • Bush, William Douglas, 1LT, (1942-1951)
  • Butler, William E., MSG, (1946-1991)
  • Carnabuci, Primo, Cpl
  • Carter, Richard, Sgt, (1951-1952)
  • Casey, John, Sgt, (1951-1953)
  • Castagna, Kay
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