Schettig, Robert Scott, CW2

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Last Rank
Chief Warrant Officer 2
Last Service Branch
Warrant Officer (pre-2004)
Last Primary MOS
100F-Pilot, OH-6
Last MOS Group
Aviation (Officer)
Primary Unit
1970-1971, 101st Airborne Division
Service Years
1969 - 1971

Warrant Officer (pre-2004)

Chief Warrant Officer 2



One Overseas Service Bar


 Last Photo   Personal Details 


Home State
New York
New York
Year of Birth
1951
 
This Military Service Page was created/owned by SSG Russell Warriner (Russ) to remember Schettig, Robert Scott, CW2.

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Casualty Info
Home Town
Spring Valley
Last Address
Spring Valley

Casualty Date
Jul 03, 1971
 
Cause
Hostile, Died while Missing
Reason
Air Loss, Crash - Land
Location
Thua Thien (Vietnam)
Conflict
Vietnam War
Location of Interment
Brookside Cemetery - Englewood, New Jersey
Wall/Plot Coordinates
03W 099

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 Military Association Memberships
Vietnam Veterans Memorial
  1971, Vietnam Veterans Memorial [Verified] - Assoc. Page

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 Ribbon Bar

Aviator Badge (Basic)

 
 Enlisted/Officer Basic Training
  1970, Aviation Warrant Officer Rotary Wing Course (Fort Wolters, TX)
 Unit Assignments
Initial Entry Rotary Wing Training Course (IERW)Aviation Center and School4th Battalion, 77th Aerial Rocket Artillery (77th ARA)/A Battery101st Airborne Division
  1969-1970, Initial Entry Rotary Wing Training Course (IERW)
  1970-1970, Aviation Center and School
  1970-1971, 4th Battalion, 77th Aerial Rocket Artillery (77th ARA)/A Battery
  1970-1971, 101st Airborne Division
 Combat and Non-Combat Operations
  1970-1971 Vietnam War/Counteroffensive Phase VII Campaign (1970-71)
  1971-1971 Vietnam War/Consolidation I Campaign (1971)
 Additional Information
Last Known Activity

Name: CW2 Robert Scott Schettig
Status: Killed In Action from an incident on 07/03/1971 while performing the duty of Aircraft Commander.
Age at death: 20.5
Date of Birth: 01/02/1951
Home City: Spring Valley, NY
Service: AV branch of the reserve component of the U.S. Army.
Unit: A/4/77 ARA 101 ABN
Major organization: 101st Airborne Division
Flight class: 70-17
Service: AV branch of the U.S. Army.
The Wall location: 03W-099
Short Summary: Mid-air of two Cobras south west of Camp Eagle. See Bergfield, Martell, and Tomlinson. Helicopter air casualty - crew
Aircraft: AH-1G tail number 67-15760
Country: South Vietnam
MOS: 100F = Pilot, OH-6
Primary cause: Mid-Air?
Major attributing cause: aircraft connected not at sea
Compliment cause: vehicular accident
Vehicle involved: helicopter
Position in vehicle: aircraft commander
Vehicle ownership: government
Started Tour: 12/12/1970
"Official" listing: helicopter air casualty - other aircrew
The initial status of this person was: non-hostile missing - interim
Length of service: *
Location: Thua Thien Province I Corps.
Military grid coordinates of event: XD875014
Reason: aircraft lost or crashed
Casualty type: Hostile - died while missing
single male U.S. citizen
Race: Caucasian
Religion: Roman Catholic
The following information secondary, but may help in explaining this incident.
Category of casualty as defined by the Army: battle dead Category of personnel: active duty Army Military class: warrant officer
This record was last updated on 11/11/1997
 
On the night of 3/4 July 1971, A Battery (Aerial Rocket Artillery), 4/77th Arty, had two aircraft on two-minute alert status at Phu Bai. At about 2320 a fire support request was received and the two AH-1G gunships immediately launched. Flight lead was Captain P. R. Bergfield.

The flight arrived in the target area at 2330 in a trail formation. Lead established a circular orbit overhead the ground troops to be supported, an orbit that was decreasing in diameter. The last contact with the flight was Captain Bergfield's call that he was "Rolling in hot" (i.e., commencing an attack run).

The ground troops observed rockets being fired and a large flash of light from the lead aircraft's position, then watched as a burning aircraft fell to earth beyond a ridgeline approximately 800 meters distant from them. A second flash of light was observed beyond the ridgeline. The ground commander advised the 4/77 tactical operations center that one or both AH-1s may have crashed. Another aviator from A/4/77 Arty, Chief Warrant Officer Barry Martens, had observed the incident, arrived at the same conclusion, and so advised the A Battery operations center.

A search and rescue team in a UH-1H Huey was launched at once. When the Huey arrived on scene the SAR team found two fires about 200 meters apart. Close observation of the fires proved that the two AH-1G Cobras had indeed crashed, probably as the direct result of a mid-air collision. Four men died in the incident:

  • In AH-1G tail number 68-15185
    • Captain Phillip Rex Bergfield, pilot
    • Captain Terry Jack Martell, copilot

     
  • In AH-1G tail number 67-15760
    • CW2 Robert Scott Schettig, pilot
    • 1st Lt Gary Preston Tomlinson, copilot
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Comments/Citation
Vietnam Wall Panel coords 03W 099

Information on U.S. Army helicopter AH-1G tail number 67-15760
The Army purchased this helicopter 0968
Total flight hours at this point: 00001690
Date: 07/03/1971
Incident number: 710703012ACD Accident case number: 710703012 Total loss or fatality Accident
Unit: A/4/77 ARA 101 ABN
This was an Operational Loss caused by an accident by Mid-Air Collision with the mission function of Armed Helicopter (having primary weapon subsystems installed and utilized to provide direct fire support)
The station for this helicopter was Phu Bai in South Vietnam
UTM grid coordinates: YD875014
Casualties = YES . . Number killed in accident = 2 . . Injured = 0 . . Passengers = 0
Search and rescue operations were Terminated
costing 0
Original source(s) and document(s) from which the incident was created or updated: Survivability/Vulnerability Information Analysis Center AVDAC database. Defense Intelligence Agency Helicopter Loss database. Army Aviation Safety Center database. Also: OPERA (Operations Report. )
Loss to Inventory and Helicopter was not recovered

Crew Members:
AC CW2 SCHETTIG ROBERT SCOTT KIA
P 1LT TOMLINSON GARY PRESTON KIA


Accident Summary:

 THE AIRCRAFT IN QUESTION WERE ON 2 MINUTE ALERT STATUS WITH AN AERIAL ROCKET ARTILLERY BATTERY. THEY RECEIVED A CONTACT MISSION AT APPROXIMATELY 2320 HOURS AND WERE IMMEDIATELY LAUNCHED. ARRIVING ON STATION AT 2330 HOURS IN TRAIL FORMATION, A CIRCLING ORBIT WAS SET UP BY THE LEAD AIRCRAFT AND WAS OBSERVED BY GROUND TROOPS, WHO INDICATED THE ORBIT GOT SMALLER AND SMALLER. THE LAST RADIO TRANSMISSION MONITORED WAS THAT THE LEAD AIRCRAFT, FLOWN BY CPT BERGFIELD, WAS "ROLLING IN HOT". AT THIS TIME THE TROOPS ON THE GROUND OBSERVED A LARGE FLASH OF FIRE AND SOME ROCKETS BEING FIRED. THE BURNING AIRCRAFT FELL TO THE GROUND OVER A RIDGE LINE 800 METERS FROM THE GROUND TROOPS WHO ALSO REPORTED SHORTLY AFTER THE FLASH OF FIRE IN THE SKY, THERE WAS ANOTHER FLASH ON THE GROUND OVER THE RIDGE LINE. THE FLASH OF FIRE IN THE SKY WAS ALSO OBSERVED BY ^CW2 BARRY MARTENS, 310-56-6339^, OF ^A BTRY, 4/77TH ARTY, 101ST ABN DIV^ WHO WATCHED THE AIRCRAFT LAUNCHED, AND DEPART THE PHU BAI COMBAT BASE TO THE SOUTHWEST IN TRAIL FORMATION. ^CW2 MARTENS^ OBSERVED THE AIRCRAFT SET UP THEIR ORBIT OVER THE CONTACT AREA AND WAS WATCHING FOR THE SECTION TO COMMENCE THEIR FIRING RUNS. ^CW2 MARTENS^ THEN OBSERVED A LARGE FLASH IN THE AREA OF THE AIRCRAFT AND COULD NO LONGER SEE THE AIRCRAFT POSITIONS LIGHTS. HE WENT TO THE BATTERY OPERATIONS CENTER AND INFORMED THE PERSONNEL ON DUTY, WHO INITIATED A RADIO SEARCH WITH NEGATIVE RESULTS. THE GROUND COMMANDER ALSO RADIOED THAT IT WAS POSSIBLE THAT THE AIRCRAFT HAD CRASHED. AT THIS TIME THE ^4TH BATTALION, 77TH ARTILLERY^ HEADQUARTERS TACTICAL OPERATIONS CENTER WAS NOTIFIED, WHO IN TURN LAUNCHED A SEARCH AND RESCUE TEAM IN A UH-1H. UPON ARRIVING ON THE SCENE, TWO FIRES WERE OBSERVED APPROXIMATELY 200 METERS APART AND WITH CLOSE OBSERVATION OF THE FIRES, IT WAS DETERMINED THAT BOTH AIRCRAFT WERE TOTALLY DESTROYED WITH LITTLE CHANCE OF SURVIVORS.\\

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