Sackett, David Lee, 1LT

Fallen
 
 Photo In Uniform   Service Details
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Last Rank
First Lieutenant
Last Service Branch
Infantry
Last Primary MOS
1542-Infantry Unit Commander
Last MOS Group
Infantry (Officer)
Primary Unit
1969-1969, 25th Infantry Division (Tropic Lightning)
Service Years
1968 - 1969

Infantry

First Lieutenant


 Last Photo   Personal Details 

11 kb

Home State
West Virginia
West Virginia
Year of Birth
1946
 
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Casualty Info
Home Town
Welch, WV
Last Address
Welch, WV

Casualty Date
Oct 24, 1969
 
Cause
Hostile, Died
Reason
Multiple Fragmentation Wounds
Location
Binh Duong (Vietnam)
Conflict
Vietnam War
Location of Interment
Arlington National Cemetery - Arlington, Virginia
Wall/Plot Coordinates
17W 114 / Section 46 Site 334-4

 Official Badges 

Infantry Shoulder Cord


 Unofficial Badges 




 Military Association Memberships
Vietnam Veterans Memorial
  2014, Vietnam Veterans Memorial [Verified] - Assoc. Page

 Photo Album   (More...


 Ribbon Bar

Combat Infantryman 1st Award

 
 Unit Assignments
2nd Battalion 12th Infantry Regiment25th Infantry Division (Tropic Lightning)
  1969-1969, A Company, 2nd Battalion 12th Infantry Regiment
  1969-1969, 25th Infantry Division (Tropic Lightning)
 Combat and Non-Combat Operations
  1969-1969 Vietnam War/Summer-Fall 1969 Campaign
 Colleges Attended 
United States Military Academy
  1964-1968, United States Military Academy
 Additional Information
Last Known Activity
Silver Star
The Silver Star Medal

1LT David Lee Sackett
Company A, 2d Battalion, 12th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division
 
For gallantry in action: First Lieutenant Sackett distinguished himself by heroic actions on 26 September 1969, while serving as a platoon leader with Company A, 2d Battalion, 12th Infantry in the Republic of Vietnam. While on a reconnaissance mission, Company A encountered a large enemy force. During the initial contact, the lead element became pinned down by the intense hostile fire. With complete disregard for his own safety, Lieutenant Sackett led four of his men forward through the enemy kill zone and swiftly destroyed the main enemy emplacements. Noticing that one of his men had been wounded, Lieutenant Sackett moved to his side and administered life saving first aid. His valorous actions contributed immeasurably to the defeat of the hostile force. Lieutenant Sackett’s bravery, aggressiveness, and devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, the 25th Infantry Division, and the United States Army.
 


Bronze Star
The Bronze Star Medal for Valor

1LT David Lee Sackett
Company A, 2d Battalion, 12th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division


 
For heroism in connection with military operations against a hostile force: First Lieutenant Sackett distinguished himself by heroic actions on 24 October 1969, while serving as a platoon leader with Company A, 2d Battalion, 12th Infantry in the Republic of Vietnam.
While on a reconnaissance operation, Company A came under heavy small arms, automatic weapons, and rocket propelled grenade fire from an enemy force in well concealed bunker positions. Immediately Lieutenant Sackett led his men in an assault of an enemy bunker, silencing the enemy. As he was advancing on another bunker, Lieutenant Sackett was fatally wounded by enemy fire. His valorous actions contributed immeasurably to the success of the mission and the defeat of the hostile force. Lieutenant Sackett’s bravery, aggressiveness, and devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, the 25th Infantry Division, and the United States Army.
   
Comments/Citation
Bronze Star
 
The Bronze Star Medal

1LT David Lee Sackett
Company A, 2d Battalion, 12th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division

 
For heroism in connection with military operations against a hostile force:  First Lieutenant Sackett distinguished himself by heroic actions on 21 September 1969, while serving as a platoon leader with Company A, 2d Battalion, 12th Infantry in the Republic of Vietnam.
While on a sweep of a village, Company A received word that a gunship had spotted an enemy soldier near the village. Immediately, Lieutenant Sackett led his platoon to the suspected area. Arriving on the scene, Lieutenant Sackett spotted the muzzle of a rifle protruding from a hidden spider hole. Unhesitatingly, Lieutenant Sackett, with complete disregard for his own safety, rushed the emplacement and threw a hand grenade into the entrance, killing the three enemy occupants. His valorous actions contributed immeasurably to the success of the mission.  Lieutenant Sackett’s bravery, aggressiveness, and devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, the 25th Infantry Division, and the United States Army.
 
 Army Commendation Medal

The Army Commendation Medal for Valor

1LT David Lee Sackett
Company A, 2d Battalion, 12th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division

 
For heroism in connection with military operations against a hostile force: First Lieutenant Sackett distinguished himself by heroic actions on 13 October 1969, while serving as a platoon leader with Company A, 2d Battalion, 12th Infantry in the Republic of Vietnam.
While moving to a night ambush site, Company A came under heavy small arms fire from an enemy force. Immediately Lieutenant Sackett organized his men in a defensive position. With complete disregard for his own safety, Lieutenant Sackett exposed himself to the hail of fire as he moved from position to position checking his men and directing their fire on the hostiles. His valorous actions contributed immeasurably to the success of the mission. Lieutenant Sackett’s bravery, aggressiveness, and devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, the 25th Infantry Division, and the United States Army.
 
 
Museum immortalizes McDowell soldier’s story
By Bill Archer 
Bluefield Daily Telegraph
28 Jun 2008

 
PRINCETON, West Virginia —
For almost 40 years, Dora Lee Sackett kept her son’s West Point dress uniform in immaculate condition. She protected the familiar Shako-style full-dress uniform hat with scarlet feather beneath a large bell jar, and kept the rest of the uniform he received during his time at the U.S. Military Academy in pristine condition as well.

 
Lieutenant David Lee Sackett grew up in Welch and received an appointment to attend West Point in 1964. He graduated from the academy on June 5, 1968, and after additional training, was sent to Vietnam the following summer. He had been in Vietnam for about three months when soldiers of the 25th Infantry Division engaged the enemy in the Ho Bo Woods area in Binh Duong Province about 28 miles north of (then) Saigon (now, Ho Chi Minh City), according to an Associated Press story dated October 26, 1969.
 

The AP reported that after a helicopter spotted Viet Cong activity at an abandoned plantation, approximately 100 soldiers of the 25th Infantry were shuttled to the battle in helicopters. “They didn’t know they were invading what was later determined to be the supply and assembly point for the 268th North Vietnamese Regiment,” according to the AP report.
 

“The enemy troops held their fire during the initial sweep and then opened up as the GIs were regrouping,” the AP reported. “Firing from craters, ‘spider holes’ and behind tree stumps, they killed eight Americans and wounded eight others with furious small-arms fire.”
 

Tony Whitlow, president of the Those Who Served War Museum located on the second floor of the Mercer County Memorial Building, said he received a call from Dora Lee Sackett last summer asking him if she could donate her son’s West Point uniform to the museum.
 

“I told her we would treat it with honor and respect, but I didn’t think anything more about it until a couple of months ago when Mrs. Sackett’s caregiver, Priscilla Cecil, called me and asked to bring the uniform to me,” Whitlow said. “She said it was Mrs. Sackett’s final request.”
 

“Aunt Dora kept David’s uniform in a big glass jar,” her nephew, Larry Koger said. “It was the first thing you noticed when you walked inside her double-wide. She was proud of David. I think that may have been what kept her going all those years. Really, she was proud of both of her sons, and her whole family. .."

   
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