Norton, John, LTG

Deceased
 
 Photo In Uniform   Service Details
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Last Rank
Lieutenant General
Last Service Branch
US
Last Primary MOS
00GD-Commanding General (Deputy)
Last MOS Group
General Officer
Primary Unit
1973-1975, Allied Joint Forces Command (JFC)
Service Years
1935 - 1975

US

Lieutenant General



Nine Overseas Service Bars


 Last Photo   Personal Details 


Home State
Virginia
Virginia
Year of Birth
1918
 
This Military Service Page was created/owned by SSG Trey W. Franklin to remember Norton, John, LTG USA(Ret).

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Contact Info
Home Town
Bayse, VA
Last Address
Bayse, VA

Date of Passing
Dec 06, 2004
 
Location of Interment
West Point Cemetery - West Point, New York
Wall/Plot Coordinates
Not Specified

 Official Badges 

Infantry Shoulder Cord Belgian Fourragere Netherlands Orange Lanyard Army Staff Identification

US Army Retired (Pre-2007) Meritorious Unit Commendation 1944-1961 French Fourragere Allied Forces Central

US Army Retired


 Unofficial Badges 

Order of Saint Maurice Order of Saint Michael (Gold)




 Additional Information
Last Known Activity
LTG John Norton died of cancer in his home in Basye, Va., on 6 Dec 2004, at age 86. General Norton was born at Fort Monroe, Virginia, and grew up in Norfolk.

General Norton, who was known as Jack, spent nearly 40 years in the Army. He joined in the mid-1930s and, after two years as an enlisted man, won an appointment to the U.S. Military Academy. At West Point, the faculty named him first captain of the Class of 1941, an honor bestowed on one cadet a year for academic achievement and leadership. The future general was the cadet commander of the corps at the academy.    

During World War II, General Norton was a paratrooper with the 505th Parachute Infantry Regiment of the famed 82nd Airborne Division, jumping behind German lines into the French village of St. Mere-Eglise on D-Day. A museum honoring the airborne efforts on D-Day now stands in St. Mere-Eglise.

General Norton also participated in the Battle of the Bulge and saw combat in Sicily, Italy, Belgium and Germany. In January 1946, he helped plan a victory parade in New York, leading the troops of the 82nd Airborne.

In the late 1940s, General Norton assisted Army General James M. Gavin in planning policies to coordinate airborne activities with the newly formed Air Force. From 1950 to 1953, he was executive officer to Army Secretary Frank Pace Jr. He spent the next several years in Yugoslavia, administering a federal aid program.

After receiving certification as an airplane and helicopter pilot in 1956, General Norton had a major role in shaping aviation within the Army. In 1962, he was a member of the Howze Board, directed by Lieutenant General Hamilton Howze, that devised the Army's modern doctrine of using airpower in wartime. Among other things, it outlined the future use of helicopters in combat.

General Norton became commanding general of the Army's 1st Cavalry Division in Vietnam in 1966, putting into practice the air cavalry recommendations he had helped frame four years before.

From 1970 to 1973, he was commanding general of the Combat Development Command at Fort Belvoir, where he oversaw the early steps of building the Black Hawk helicopter and the M1 Abrams main battle tank. In his final military post, from 1973 to 1975, Gen. Norton was deputy commander in chief of NATO's Allied Joint Force Command in Naples.

After his retirement from the Army, he worked with other military leaders in advising Pentagon officials and members of Congress. He also closely followed developments at West Point. He assisted in preparing three documentaries about airborne operations during World War II for the History Channel.

He is a member of the Army Aviation Hall of Fame and the Army Field Experimentation Hall of Fame. On 22 Sept 2004, he received the Doughboy Award for his contributions to combat Infantry.

His wife of 46 years, Cheyney McNabb Norton, died in 1992.

His second wife, Leslie C. Smith, whom he married in 1992, died in 2002.

Survivors include three children, retired Army Lieutenant Colonel John Norton Jr. of Berryville, Virginia, Alexandra Norton of San Miguel de Allende, Mexico, and Cheyney Edwards of Warrenton; a sister; nine grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren.

   
Other Comments:

Army Aviation Hall of Fame 1977 Induction

Lieutenant General John Norton became associated with Army Aviation in 1955 when he was assigned to the Office of the Chief for Research and Development in the Department of the Army. He served as chief of the Airborne, Aviation, and Electronics Division, and of the Airmobility Division. During that three-year tour, he attended the Army Aviation School, earning a dual rating as a fixed and rotary wing aviator.

He was assigned as the Army Aviation Officer, Headquarters, USCONARC, Fort Monroe, in September 1960. In that capacity, he was twice selected to serve on high-level boards. The first was the Hoelscher Committee which was formed to study and make proposals to the chief of staff regarding the reorganization of the Army.

The second board General Norton served on was the Tactical Mobility Requirements, or air assault doctrine while using simple, rugged aircraft. In September 1962, he returned to USCONARC headquarters and worked until May 1963 as chief of the Aviation Division, DCSUTR.

His assignments in Vietnam included commanding the 1st Air Cavalry Division. He left that position in June 1967 to become commanding general of the Army Aviation Materiel Command, St. Louis, MO. Lieutenant General Norton retired from active duty at Fort Monroe, VA, in July 1975.

   
 Photo Album   (More...


 Ribbon Bar

Combat Infantryman 2nd Award
Aviator Badge (Basic)

Master Parachutist (4 Combat Jumps)

 
 Enlisted/Officer Basic Training
  1937, US Military Academy (West Point, NY)
 Unit Assignments
Airborne School505th Infantry Regiment (Airborne)82nd Airborne DivisionArmy Combat Developments Command
Department of the Army (DA)Aviation Center and SchoolUS Continental Army Command (CONARC)1st Cavalry Division (Unit of Action)
US Army Materiel Command (AMC)US Army Training and Doctrine Command (TRADOC)Allied Joint Forces Command (JFC)
  1941-1941, Airborne School
  1942-1945, 1542, 2nd Battalion, 505th Infantry Regiment (Airborne)/HHC
  1942-1945, 82nd Airborne Division/HHC
  1947-1949, 2040, Army Combat Developments Command
  1950-1953, Office of the Secretary of the Army
  1955-1958, Research & Development Center (RDEC)
  1956-1956, Aviation Center and School
  1960-1963, US Continental Army Command (CONARC)
  1966-1967, 00GC, HHC, 1st Cavalry Division (Heavy Armored)
  1967-1970, US Army Materiel Command (AMC)
  1970-1973, TRADOC Combat Developments
  1973-1975, Allied Joint Forces Command (JFC)
 Combat and Non-Combat Operations
  1943-1943 WWII - European-African-Middle Eastern Theater/Sicily Campaign (1943)
  1943-1943 Sicily Campaign (1943)/Operation Husky
  1943-1944 WWII - European-African-Middle Eastern Theater/Naples-Foggia Campaign (1943-44)
  1944-1944 WWII - European-African-Middle Eastern Theater/Northern France Campaign (1944)
  1944-1944 D-Day Glider Landings/Mission Detroit
  1944-1944 Operation Overlord/D-Day Beach Landings - Operation Neptune
  1944-1944 Rhineland Campaign (1944-45)/Operation Market Garden
  1944-1945 WWII - European-African-Middle Eastern Theater/Rhineland Campaign (1944-45)
  1945-1945 WWII - European-African-Middle Eastern Theater/Central Europe Campaign (1945)
  1945-1945 US Occupation of Germany (WWII)
  1966-1966 Vietnam War/Counteroffensive Campaign (1965-66)
  1966-1967 Vietnam War/Counteroffensive Phase II Campaign (1966-67)
 Colleges Attended 
United States Military Academy
  1937-1941, United States Military Academy
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