Kaho'ohanohano, Anthony T, PFC

Fallen
 
 Photo In Uniform   Service Details
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Last Rank
Private First Class
Last Service Branch
Infantry
Last Primary MOS
1812-Machine Gun Section or Squad Leader
Last MOS Group
Infantry (Enlisted)
Primary Unit
1950-1951, 2nd Brigade, 7th Infantry Division
Service Years
1950 - 1951

Private First Class



Two Overseas Service Bars


 Last Photo   Personal Details 

61 kb

Home State
Hawaii
Hawaii
Year of Birth
1930
 
This Military Service Page was created/owned by SP 4 Steven Ryan (LoneWolf) to remember Kaho'ohanohano, Anthony T, Pfc.

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Casualty Info
Home Town
Not Specified
Last Address
Maui

Casualty Date
Sep 01, 1951
 
Cause
Hostile, Died
Reason
Gun, Small Arms Fire
Location
Korea
Conflict
Korean War
Location of Interment
Maui Veterans Cemetery - Makawao, Hawaii
Wall/Plot Coordinates
Not Specified

 Official Badges 

Infantry Shoulder Cord 7th Infantry Division


 Unofficial Badges 




 Military Association Memberships
17th Infantry Regiment AssociationKorean War Fallen
  1951, 17th Infantry Regiment Association [Verified]
  1951, Korean War Fallen

 Photo Album   (More...


 Ribbon Bar

Combat Infantryman 1st Award
Rifle

 
 Unit Assignments
2nd Battalion, 17th Infantry Regiment2nd Brigade, 7th Infantry Division
  1950-1951, 2nd Battalion, 17th Infantry Regiment
  1950-1951, 2nd Brigade, 7th Infantry Division
 Combat and Non-Combat Operations
  1950-1950 Korean War/UN Offensive (1950)/Eighth Army Offensive
  1950-1953 Korean War
  1951-1951 Korean War/First UN Counteroffensive (1951)/Battle of Chipyong-ni
 Additional Information
Last Known Activity

PFC Kahoohanohano, Anthony T. US Army 

Medal of Honor

Co. H, 17th Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division
Date of Action: September 1, 1951

Citation:
 
For extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company H, 2d Battalion, 17th Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. Private First Class Kahoohanohano distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Chup'a-ri, Korea, on 1 September 1951. On that date, Private Kahoohanohano was in charge of a machine-gun squad supporting the defensive positions of Company F when a numerically superior enemy force launched a fierce attack. Because of the overwhelming numbers of the enemy, it was necessary for the friendly troops to execute a limited withdrawal. As the men fell back, he ordered his squad to take up more tenable positions and provide covering fire for the friendly force. Then, although painfully wounded in the shoulder during the initial enemy assault, he gathered a supply of grenades and ammunition and returned to his original position to face the enemy alone. As the hostile troops concentrated their strength against his emplacement in an effort to overrun it, Private Kahoohanohano fought fiercely and courageously, delivering deadly accurate fire into the ranks of the onrushing enemy. When his ammunition was depleted, he engaged the enemy in hand-to-hand combat until he was killed. His heroic stand so inspired his comrades that they launched a counterattack that completely repulse the enemy. Coming upon Private Kahoohanohano's position, the friendly troops found eleven enemy soldiers lying dead before it and two in the emplacement itself, beaten to death with an entrenching shovel.




DISTINGUISHED SERVICE CROSS UPGRADED:


Fifty-eight years ago Private 1st Class Anthony Kaho'ohanohano died while providing cover fire for retreating U.S. troops, killing 11 enemy fighters with his rifle and two more with his shovel before being fatally wounded.     On Wednesday, he received long-overdue recognition for his battlefield heroism; Language inserted into the fiscal 2010 Defense Authorization Bill signed into law by the president upgraded his posthumous Distinguished Service Cross to a Medal of Honor, the highest military award for valor under fire.

The move came after years of lobbying from his family members and lawmakers from Hawaii. Earlier this year, Army Secretary Peter Geren backed the decision, agreeing that Kahoohanohan's actions warranted the higher honor.  According to his Distinguished Service Cross citation, Kahoohanohanowas was serving with the 17th Regiment, Seventh Infantry Division on Sept. 1, 1951, when his company's position was overrun by enemy troops.

Because of the overwhelming numbers of the enemy, it was necessary for the friendly troops to execute a limited withdrawal. As the men fell back, he ordered his squad to take up more tenable positions and provide covering fire for the friendly force. Then, although painfully wounded in the shoulder during the initial enemy assault, he gathered a supply of grenades and ammunition and returned to his original position to face the enemy alone. ... His heroic stand so inspired his comrades that they launched a counterattack that completely repulse the enemy.

White House officials said they'll hold a ceremony to formally present the award in coming weeks, but no details have yet been finalized.

   
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