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Russell, Samuel, COL Quartermaster Corps (Officer)
 
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Current Service Status
USA Active
Current/Last Rank
Colonel
Current/Last Service Branch
Logistics Branch Officer
Current/Last Primary MOS
90A-Logistics
Current/Last MOS Group
Quartermaster Corps (Officer)
Current/Last Unit
2012-Present, 90A TC, US Army Central Command (USARCENT)
Previously Held MOS
92B-Supply Material Management
92D-Aerial Delivery and Materiel
92F-Petroleum and Water
92A-Quartermaster, General
90A TC-Logistics
Service Years
1988 - Present
Unofficial US Army Certificates
Operation Iraqi Freedom
Operation Enduring Freedom
Cold War Certificate
Order of Saint Martin
Voice Edition

Logistics Branch Officer


Ranger
Colonel



Six Overseas Service Bars



 Ribbon Bar

Combat Action 1st Award

Senior ParachutistParachute Rigger
Quartermaster
Thailand - Jump Wings

 

 Official Badges 

Military Order of the Loyal Legion United States Joint Forces Command USA Central 3rd Sustainment Brigade

10th Mountain Division 3rd Infantry Division 1st Sustainment Command


 Unofficial Badges 

Airborne Red Hat Pin Order of Saint Martin Cold War Veteran




 Additional Information
What are you doing now:

LTC Wellington W. Samouce, USA & USMC, Gulf War & Iraq War vet (cousin)
Col(ret) Thomas W. Russell, USMC, Gulf War vet (brother)
Maj Barbara R. Bucknam, USAF, Gulf War vet (sister)
Col(ret) Mark A. Bucknam, USAF (brother-in-law)
Col(ret) Thomas B. Russell, USA, Vietnam vet (father)
LTC(ret) Lawrence Russell, III, USA, Vietnam vet (uncle)
COL(ret) Warren A. Samouce, USA, Vietnam vet (uncle)
Capt John W. Samouce, USMC, Vietnam vet (uncle)
CPL(T) John A. McDaniel, USA & USN, WWII & Korea vet (father-in-law)
LTC(ret) Lawrence Russell, Jr., USAR
, WWII & Korea vet (grandfather)
COL(ret) Wellington A. Samouce, USA, WWII vet (grandfather)
COL(ret) James A. Samouce, USA, WWII vet (granduncle)
MAJ(ret) George A. Samouce, USAR, WWI & WWII vet (granduncle)
Nicholas A. Samouce, USA, WWI vet (granduncle)
Capt.(ret) Carrol L. Tyler, USN, WWII vet (granduncle-in-law)
BG(ret) William R. Woodward, USA, WWI & WWII vet (granduncle-in-law)
COL(ret) Fred B. Inglis, USA, WWI & WWII vet (granduncle-in-law)
COL(ret) Warren W. Whitside, USA, Span. Amer. War, Punitive Exped & WWI vet (gr-grandfather)
LTC Archie Miller, USA, Span. Amer. War vet and Medal of Honor recipient (gr-granduncle-in-law)
MAJ Victor M. Whitside, USA, WWI vet (gr-granduncle)
BG(ret) Samuel M. Whitside, USA, Civil War, Indian Wars, Span. Amer. War vet (gr-gr-grandfather)
LTC Charles B. Bostwick, NY Vol, Civil War vet (gr-grandfather)
MAJ Henry A. Bostwick, NY Vol, Civil War vet (gr-granduncle)
1LT John H. Russell, NY State Militia, War of 1812 vet (gr-gr-gr-gr-grandfather)
Dr. Thomas Russell, CT Line, Revolutionary War vet (gr-gr-gr-gr-gr-grandfather)
CPL Enos Wood, VT Militia, Revolutionary War vet (gr-gr-gr-gr-gr-grandfather)
SGT Samuel Smith, VT Militia, Revolutionary War (gr-gr-gr-gr-gr-grandfather)
CPT Reuben Bostwick, CT Line, French and Indian War & Revolutionary War (gr-gr-gr-gr-gr-grandfather)
Benajah Stone, IV, CT Line, French and Indian War (gr-gr-gr-gr-gr-grandfather)
1LT James McGavock, Sr., VA State Militia, French and Indian War & Revolutionary War (gr-gr-gr-gr-gr-grandfather)
Jacob Wead, CT Line, French and Indian War vet (gr-gr-gr-gr-gr-grandfather)
Capt James Turner, Jr., VA State Militia, Revolutionary War (gr-gr-gr-gr-gr-grandfather)
Capt William Curtis, Conn. Colonial Officer, King Philip's War (gr-gr-gr-gr-gr-gr-gr-gr-grandfather)

   
Other Comments:
COL Sam Russell was commissioned a second lieutenant in the Quartermaster Corps in 1988 after graduating from the Virginia Military Institute. He is a fifth-generation Army officer and the father of three wonderful children. Prior to his arrival at Shaw Air Force Base, South Carolina as the Chief, G-4 Mobility Division, Third Army (US Army Central), he was a student at the US Army War College at Carlisle Barracks, Pennsylvania.

COL Russell’s Operational Force assignments include serving as a lieutenant with the 142d Supply and Service Battalion, Wiesbaden, Germany; as a captain with the 528th Special Operations Support Battalion (Airborne), Fort Bragg, North Carolina; as a major with the 2d Infantry Division at Camp Red Cloud, Korea, and with the 3d Infantry Division and the 24th Corps Support Group at Fort Stewart and Hunter Army Airfield, Georgia; and as a Lieutenant Colonel where he commanded the 94th Brigade Support Battalion, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division at Ft Polk, Louisiana and Baghdad, Iraq. His Generating Force assignments include service as a Quartermaster Assignments Officer, US Total Army Personnel Comamnd, Alexandria, Virginia; J4 Executive Assistant to BG Terry Juskowiak and BG Robert Dail, US Atlantic Command, Norfolk, Virginia; and Chief, Office of the Quartermaster General, US Army Quartermaster School, Fort Lee, Virginia.

COL Russell is a graduate of the Army War College at Carlisle, Pennsylvania, and the Command and General Staff College at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. He holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Civil Engineering from VMI, a Masters of Military Arts and Science in History from USAC&GSC, and a Masters of Strategic Studies from USAWC. He has deployed in support of Operation Uphold Democracy (Cuba), Operation Enduring Freedom (Kuwait, Qatar and Pakistan), and twice to Operation Iraqi Freedom (Iraq). His awards include the Bronze Star Medal with bronze oak leaf cluster, Meritorious Service Medal with silver oak leaf cluster, Joint Service Commendation Medal, Army Commendation Medal with bronze oak leaf cluster, Army Achievement Medal with bronze oak leaf cluster, the Combat Action Badge, the Ranger Tab, the Senior Parachutist Badge, the Rigger Badge, and numerous other campaign and service medals and ribbons.
 
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 Basic Combat Training
  1988, Fort Lee (Quartermaster Basic Officer Leader Course), 89-31
 Unit Assignments
US Army Cadet Command/ROTC Virginia Military Institute Airborne School, Fort BenningQuartermaster UnitsRanger School, Fort Benning
142nd Supply and Services Battalion528th Special Operations Support BattalionUS Army Forces Command (FORSCOM)/US Army Personnel Command PERSCOMUnited States Atlantic Command (USACOM)
United States Joint Forces Command (JFCOM)2nd Infantry DivisionCommand and General Staff College (CGSC)559th Quartermaster Battalion
Division Support Command (DISCOM), 3rd Infantry Division3rd Sustainment Brigade3rd Infantry Division94th Brigade Support Battalion
Quartermaster Center & School, Fort LeeArmy War CollegeUS Army Central Command (USARCENT)
  1984-1988, US Army Cadet Command/ROTC Virginia Military Institute
  1985-1985, Airborne School, Fort Benning
  1988-1989, 92A, Quartermaster Officer Basic Course
  1989-1989, 92A, Ranger School, Fort Benning
  1989-1992, 92B, 142nd Supply and Services Battalion/29th Supply and Services Company
  1992-1992, 92A, Quartermaster Officer Advanced Course
  1992-1995, 92D, 528th Special Operations Support Battalion
  1995-1998, 92A, US Army Forces Command (FORSCOM)/US Army Personnel Command PERSCOM
  1998-1998, Command and General Staff College (CGSC)/Combined Arms and Services Staff School
  1998-1999, 90A, United States Atlantic Command (USACOM)
  1999-2000, 90A, United States Joint Forces Command (JFCOM)
  2000-2001, 90A, 2nd Infantry Division
  2001-2002, 92A, Command and General Staff College (CGSC)
  2002-2004, 92F, 559th Quartermaster Battalion/HHC
  2004-2005, 90A, Division Support Command (DISCOM), 3rd Infantry Division/HHC
  2005-2006, 90A, 3rd Sustainment Brigade
  2006-2007, 90A, 3rd Infantry Division/3rd Infantry Division G4
  2007-2009, 90A, 94th Brigade Support Battalion
  2009-2011, 92A, Quartermaster Center & School, Fort Lee
  2011-2012, 90A, Army War College
  2012-Present, 90A TC, US Army Central Command (USARCENT)
 Combat and Operations History
  1994-1995 U.S. Military Operations/Haiti - Operation Uphold Democracy
  2002-2002 Forward Operating Bases - OEF 200212
  2005-2005 Operation Iraqi Freedom (2003 - 2010)/Iraqi Governance (June 29, 2004-Dec. 15, 2005)1
  2005-2005 Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF)(2005)/Camp Taji4
  2005-2005 Operation Iraqi Freedom (2003 - 2010)/National Resolution (Dec. 16, 2005-Jan. 9, 2007)6
  2007-2008 Operation Iraqi Freedom (2003 - 2010)/Surge (Jan. 1, 2007 - Dec. 31, 2008)
  2008-2008 Operation Iraqi Freedom Forward Operating Bases/Rustimiyah37
  2009-2009 Operation Iraqi Freedom (2003 - 2010)/Iraqi Sovereignty (Jan. 1, 2009 -Aug 31, 2010)
 Military Association Memberships
United Services Automobile Association (USAA)Association of QuartermastersSociety of the 3rd Infantry Division10th Mountain Division
Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States (MOLLUS)Army War College FoundationArmy TWS Advisory GroupFort Jackson - Palmetto State Chapter
  1984, United Services Automobile Association (USAA) [Verified] - Assoc. Page
  1992, Association of Quartermasters
  2006, Society of the 3rd Infantry Division
  2008, 10th Mountain Division
  2010, Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States (MOLLUS) - Assoc. Page
  2011, Army War College Foundation
  2013, Army TWS Advisory Group [Verified]
  2013, Association of United States Army (AUSA), Fort Jackson - Palmetto State Chapter (Member-at-Large) (Columbia, South Carolina) - Chap. Page


 Remembrance Profiles -  55 Soldiers Remembered
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Reflections on COL Russell's US Army Service
 
 Reflections On My Service
 
PLEASE DESCRIBE WHO OR WHAT INFLUENCED YOUR DECISION TO JOIN THE ARMY?
COL Samuel Russell - Please describe who or what influenced your decision to join the Army?Family tradition. My Brother, Col Tom Russell, was a Marine Officer. My Sister and her Husband were Air Force Officers. My Father, COL Tom Russell, was a career Army engineer. All of my Uncles served. Both my Grandfathers, LTC Lawrence Russell, Jr. and COL Sammy Samouce, were career Officers and WWII vets. One of my Great-Grandfathers, COL Warren Whitside, was a career Officer and a veteran of the Great War (WWI). His Father, BG Sam Whitside, was a career cavalry officer and a veteran of the Civil War, Indian Wars and Spanish American War. I guess that makes me a fifth generation Army Officer.
WHETHER YOU WERE IN THE SERVICE FOR SEVERAL YEARS OR AS A CAREER, PLEASE DESCRIBE THE DIRECTION OR PATH YOU TOOK. WHAT WAS YOUR REASON FOR LEAVING?
COL Samuel Russell - Whether you were in the service for several years or as a career, please describe the direction or path you took. What was your reason for leaving?I was branched Quartermaster and have served in the logistics field for all of my 24 years of service. Going to Ranger school right after QM Officer Basic definitely helped to set a "Warrior first, Logistician second" frame of mind and has carried with me through my entire career. It is a shame that it is so difficult for today's Sustainment Officers to get slots in Ranger school, as it really is the premier Army leadership course.
IF YOU PARTICIPATED IN COMBAT, PEACEKEEPING OR HUMANITARIAN OPERATIONS, PLEASE DESCRIBE THOSE WHICH WERE THE MOST SIGNIFICANT TO YOU AND, IF LIFE-CHANGING, IN WHAT WAY.
Following is an email I sent to family and friends during my Battalion Command tour in Baghdad.

From: Russell, Samuel L LTC MIL USA FORSCOM
Sent: Thu, 3 Apr 2008 4:10 pm
Subject: Another Memorial

Family and Friends...

I've been trying to get out another update on the events of the past COL Samuel Russell - If you participated in combat, peacekeeping or humanitarian operations, please describe those which were the most significant to you and, if life-changing, in what way.two months, but we've had a busy couple of weeks -- large spike in insurgent activity. Unfortunately, our brigade lost several Soldiers. Again, my battalion was spared any casualties. I can't bring myself to write about my trivial goings on with the weight of the latest combat operations, and the burden of the associated loss. That will have to wait.

One of the missions my unit performs is recovering heavily damaged vehicles that units are unable to self-recover. We had several over the past week into heavily contested areas. Our follow-on missions after a recovery are to sanitize the damaged or destroyed vehicles, process the human remains and prepare the fallen Soldiers for transport through the mortuary in Baghdad and on to the mortuary in Dover. Unless out on a mission, I am always present when remains are brought back and vehicles are sanitized. It is the most solemn of missions and at the same time potentially the most psychologically demanding that my Soldiers encounter.

One of my recovery teams went out with 2nd Battalion, 16th Infantry Regiment -- Rangers -- to bring back a destroyed HMMWV and two of their fallen comrades. This mission involved running a gauntlet of improvised explosive devices (IED), rocket propelled grenades (RPG) and small arms fire--there and back--and, thank God, our guys returned unscathed, despite being hit by all three. I was there when we downloaded the severely damaged gun truck, which was missing an armored door after receiving the full blast of an explosively formed projectile (EFP). After untarping the vehicle and beginning the sanitization, I moved to the mortuary affairs collection point where I met those two young Rangers, not in life but in death. The earthly remnants of their bodies were void of the souls and spirits that so recently filled them with life and aspirations, but had now moved onto a better place. After fourteen months of hard fought combat, these two Rangers were only days from going home; each was in his early twenties. I stood shoulder-to-shoulder with my chaplain as he prayed over the bodies of these two fine young men.

No movie can capture the essence of war, not even the beach landing scene in Saving Private Ryan. Rightfully, such true to life experiences should not be seen and felt by anyone. Beyond the sights and sounds of battle, the movies can never bring to the viewer the overwhelming crush to the other senses: touch, taste and smell. My attempts to describe the variety and severity of each sensory input would make this message unreadable. So, I'll spare you those details. Suffice it to say that the most overwhelming sense is that of loss.

Today we held the traditional memorial ceremony for both of them. It was comforting to see photos of them when they were whole, strong, motivated and proud to serve. Unfortunately, what I'll carry with me is the images of my meeting with them at my mortuary as we prepared them for their hero flight home.

General of the Army Douglas MacArthur once said, "The soldier above all others prays for peace, for it is the soldier who must suffer and bear the deepest wounds and scars of war."

While this is true, the Soldier also prays for his life, the life of his buddy next to him, the loved ones he is serving to protect, and his safe return home where he can peacefully enjoy that blanket of freedom for which he has sacrificed so much. He prays for victory, for strength in battle, for the annihilation of his enemy, and for retribution of fallen comrades. But what separates a Soldier's prayer from any other God-fearing American, is that he puts his prayers into action. Wielding his God-given strength he storms into the cauldron of fire, takes the fight to the enemy, places his life on the line for his buddies, seeks vengeance for his fallen comrades, and annihilates the enemy.

May God continue to bless our Nation with young men like Specialist Durrell Bennett and Private First Class Patrick Miller, young men that not only pray for peace but are willing to answer the prayers of millions of Americans by waging into battle to protect and preserve that blanket of freedom. Sleep gently tonight America, for your brave young men are standing firmly at their post.

God Bless, Sam

SAMUEL L. RUSSELL
LTC, LG
94th BSB Commander
FOB Rustamiyah
OF ALL YOUR DUTY STATIONS OR ASSIGNMENTS, WHICH ONE DO YOU HAVE FONDEST MEMORIES OF AND WHY? WHICH ONE WAS YOUR LEAST FAVORITE?
COL Samuel Russell - Of all your duty stations or assignments, which one do you have fondest memories of and why? Which one was your least favorite?My first assignment was to Wiesbaden Air Base, West Germany. It was an outstanding community--Army, Air Force, and German. It also was a phenomenal time to be in Germany, 1989 to 1992. We were able to see the Berlin Wall come down and East and West become a unified nation again. Our trip through Check Point Alpha, through the East German corridor to Check Point Bravo, and ultimately through Check Point Charlie to East Berlin was one of the highlights of my early career. Being able to chip on the Wall and secure a large chunk of it was priceless.
FROM YOUR ENTIRE SERVICE, INCLUDING COMBAT, DESCRIBE THE PERSONAL MEMORIES WHICH HAVE IMPACTED YOU MOST?
COL Samuel Russell - From your entire service, including combat, describe the personal memories which have impacted you most?There are so many memories. One particular memory is of perhaps my most emotionally demanding duty in the Army, notifying a young wife that she was now a widow, and telling her mother-in-law that her Soldier-son was gone.
WHAT ACHIEVEMENT(S) ARE YOU MOST PROUD OF FROM YOUR MILITARY CAREER? IF YOU RECEIVED ANY MEDALS FOR VALOR OR OTHER SIGNIFICANT AWARDS, PLEASE DESCRIBE HOW THESE WERE EARNED.
COL Samuel Russell - What achievement(s) are you most proud of from your military career? If you received any medals for valor or other significant awards, please describe how these were earned.No valorous awards here. I received a Combat Action Badge in March 2005 because the Combat Logistics Patrol in which I was traveling through west Baghdad came under small arms fire. One Iraqi truck driver (white trucks) was wounded. I was the Brigade S3 out observing the patrol. We halted the patrol to assess the casualty and swap out drivers. My sole role was to dismount, move to the nearest Blue Force Tracker, and send up a SALUTE report. My two bronze stars are for meritorious service in combat.
OF ALL THE MEDALS, AWARDS, QUALIFICATION BADGES OR DEVICES YOU RECEIVED, PLEASE DESCRIBE THE ONE(S) MOST MEANINGFUL TO YOU AND WHY?
COL Samuel Russell - Of all the medals, awards, qualification badges or devices you received, please describe the one(s) most meaningful to you and why?My 10th Mountain Division Shoulder Sleeve Insignia-Foreign Wartime Service, or combat patch is my most meaningful badge, as I wear it in memory of two Soldiers that were killed in action under my command, SGT Mark Stone and SGT Marcus Mathes, as well as for all the Soldiers that I was privileged to serve along side in Iraq. Everything else on my uniform is bling.
WHICH INDIVIDUAL(S) FROM YOUR TIME IN THE MILITARY STAND OUT AS HAVING THE MOST POSITIVE IMPACT ON YOU AND WHY?
COL Samuel Russell - Which individual(s) from your time in the military stand out as having the most positive impact on you and why?There have been so many mentors and friends, subordinates, peers and superiors alike. Perhaps the one that has shaped me more than any other, is my good friend, Shawn Morrissey. I served as his executive officer when he commanded the 559th Quartermaster Battalion, then as a Brigade S3 Operations Officer when he was the Deputy Commanding Officer, and finally as his deputy when he was the 3d Infantry Division G4 Logistics Officer. Through war and peace he has been a trusted friend and mentor.
CAN YOU RECOUNT A PARTICULAR INCIDENT FROM YOUR SERVICE WHICH MAY OR MAY NOT HAVE BEEN FUNNY AT THE TIME, BUT STILL MAKES YOU LAUGH?
One stands out. As a green 2nd Lt. and Platoon Leader, I was on my first and only REFORGER (Return Forces to Germany). It was January or February 1990 in Ingolstadt, Germany, and bitterly cold. I was checking my Laundry and Bath site, and noticed that the 1,500 gallon stave COL Samuel Russell - Can you recount a particular incident from your service which may or may not have been funny at the time, but still makes you laugh?tank in the back of the shower tent had a thick coat of ice on it. I took my M16 and used the butt of the rifle to try and crack the ice. Just when I broke the ice, the weapon slipped from my hand and sunk to the bottom of the tank. As I was staring into the tank contemplating how to retrieve my rifle from the icy water, two of my Squad Leaders, Sergeant Warner and Sergeant Burkhalter, appeared from behind me and asked what I was looking at. I explained what happened and told them to fetch me a rake, and not mention the incident to anyone. One retrieved a rake while the other ran back to the company headquarters. When I returned to the headquarters, the Company had formed an impromptu gauntlet that I had to traverse, with my Company Commander at the end waiting with a weapons cleaning kit.
WHAT PROFESSION DID YOU FOLLOW AFTER YOUR MILITARY SERVICE AND WHAT ARE YOU DOING NOW? IF YOU ARE CURRENTLY SERVING, WHAT IS YOUR PRESENT OCCUPATIONAL SPECIALTY?
I am currently serving as the Chief, Mobility Division at Thrid Army (USARCENT) G4--Patton's Own!--Shaw Air Force Base, SC.
WHAT MILITARY ASSOCIATIONS ARE YOU A MEMBER OF, IF ANY? WHAT SPECIFIC BENEFITS DO YOU DERIVE FROM YOUR MEMBERSHIPS?
I am a lifetime member of the Association of Quartermasters and have served as the active duty member of the board.

I joined the Society of the Third Infantry Division after completing my first tour in Iraq with the 3d Infantry Division Support Brigade.

While home on R&R during my Battalion Command tour in Baghdad, I visited some of our wounded warriors in Walter Reed Hospital. One of my Soldiers, a double amputee, had just returned from a vacation with his wife in Alaska. When I asked who sponsored the trip, he mentioned that it was funded through the 10th Mountain Division Association. I've been a member ever since.

Two years ago I joined a hereditary organization, the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States--MOLLUS. My Gr-gr-grandfather was an original member, and my gr-grandfather also was a member. I thought I would pay them respect and homage by joining as well.

Most recently, while at Carlisle, PA, I became a lifetime member of the Army War College Foundation.
IN WHAT WAYS HAS SERVING IN THE MILITARY INFLUENCED THE WAY YOU HAVE APPROACHED YOUR LIFE AND YOUR CAREER?
COL Samuel Russell - In what ways has serving in the military influenced the way you have approached your life and your career?It has influenced everything I do, from the way I approach solutions to problems to how I interact with family and friends, from inspiring me with a desire for life-long learning, to instilling me with the Army values.
BASED ON YOUR OWN EXPERIENCES, WHAT ADVICE WOULD YOU GIVE TO THOSE WHO HAVE RECENTLY JOINED THE ARMY?
COL Samuel Russell - Based on your own experiences, what advice would you give to those who have recently joined the Army?God bless you. Enjoy, or at least appreciate, every day in the service and every Solider, Sailor, Airman and Marine that you're privileged to work along side.
IN WHAT WAYS HAS TOGETHERWESERVED.COM HELPED YOU REMEMBER YOUR MILITARY SERVICE AND THE FRIENDS YOU SERVED WITH.
Togetherweserved.com has been a great outlet to commemorate the service of some outstanding Americans that have gone before me: those with whom I have had the privilege of serving alongside, and those who have served as sterling examples to me of service to our Nation.

DMR

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