Cutinha, Nicholas Joseph, SP 4 Fallen
 
 TWS Ribbon Bar
 
 Photo In Uniform   Service Details
35 kb
View Time Line
Last Rank
Specialist 4
Last Service Branch
Infantry
Last Primary MOS
11B-Infantryman
Last MOS Group
Infantry (Enlisted)
Last Unit
1968-1968, 25th Infantry Division (Tropic Lightning Division)
Service Years
1967 - 1968



Specialist 4


 Last Photo   Personal Details 

7 kb

Home State
Florida
Florida
Year of Birth
1945
 
Casualty Info
Home Town
Alva
Last Address
Alva

Casualty Date
Mar 02, 1968
 
Cause
Hostile, Died
Reason
Gun, Small Arms Fire
Location
Gia Dinh
Conflict
Vietnam War/Unspecified Operation
Location of Interment
Not Specified
Wall/Plot Coordinates
42E 030

 Official Badges 

Infantry Shoulder Cord 25th Infantry Division


 Unofficial Badges 




 Military Association Memberships
Military Order of the Purple HeartLegion Of Valor
  1968, Military Order of the Purple Heart [Verified] - Assoc. Page
  1968, Legion Of Valor [Verified] - Assoc. Page

 Photo Album   (More...


 Ribbon Bar

Combat Infantryman 1st Award

Rifle

 
 Unit Assignments
9th Infantry Regiment25th Infantry Division (Tropic Lightning Division)
  1968-1968, 9th Infantry Regiment
  1968-1968, 25th Infantry Division (Tropic Lightning Division)
 Basic Combat Training
  1967, Fort Campbell KY (Basic Training), 0
 Combat and Operations History
  1945-1975 Vietnam War
  1945-1989 Cold War (1945-1989)
 Additional Information
Last Known Activity



 CUTINHA, NICHOLAS J.
 Rank and organization: Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, Company C, 4th Battalion, 9th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Place and date: Near Gia Dinh, Republic of Vietnam, 2 March 1968. Entered service at: Coral Gables, Fla. Born: 13 January 1945, Fernandina Beach, Fla. 

Citation:
 For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty. While serving as a machine gunner with Company C, Sp4c. Cutinha accompanied his unit on a combat mission near Gia Dinh. Suddenly his company came under small arms, automatic weapons, mortar and rocket propelled grenade fire, from a battalion size enemy unit. During the initial hostile attack, communication with the battalion was lost and the company commander and numerous members of the company became casualties. When Sp4c. Cutinha observed that his company was pinned down and disorganized, he moved to the front with complete disregard for his safety, firing his machinegun at the charging enemy. As he moved forward he drew fire on his own position and was seriously wounded in the leg. As the hostile fire intensified and half of the company was killed or wounded, Sp4c. Cutinha assumed command of all the survivors in his area and initiated a withdrawal while providing covering fire for the evacuation of the wounded. He killed several enemy soldiers but sustained another leg wound when his machinegun was destroyed by incoming rounds. Undaunted, he crawled through a hail of enemy fire to an operable machinegun in order to continue the defense of his injured comrades who were being administered medical treatment. Sp4c. Cutinha maintained this position, refused assistance, and provided defensive fire for his comrades until he fell mortally wounded. He was solely responsible for killing 15 enemy soldiers while saving the lives of at least 9 members of his own unit. Sp4c. Cutinha's gallantry and extraordinary heroism were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the U.S. Army. 



   
Comments/Citation

Vietnam Wall Panel coords 42E 030 Mitchell Holloway wayne@phonl.com A friend from the same Company 4333 7th Avenue Marianna, FL 32446 USA Porky at Katum I met "Porky" a few days after I joined the 4th Bn./9th Inf. (Manchus) at the dustiest place in the world, a forward basecamp called Katum near the Black Virgin Mountain northeast of TayNinh. In early January 1968 there wasn't much happening except the occasional mortar attack so we had time to visit, play cards and talk about home. I was in the 81MM mortar platoon and Porky (who I never knew by his given name) was in a rifle platoon, a machine-gunner. But he got around and visited with some of the fellows he had been in training with in the states. He was a likable fellow with a friendly manner and an infectious grin. I read the account of what Nicholas did the day we were ambushed at the Hoc Mon Bridge. I feel honored to know that we once sat and talked about home, maybe even our girlfriends. Monday, June 04, 2001


   
Copyright Togetherweserved.com Inc 2003-2011