Alderson, Thomas Earl, CPT Fallen
 
 Photo In Uniform   Service Details
14 kb
View Time Line
Last Rank
Captain
Last Service Branch
Dental Corps
Last Primary MOS
3170-General Dentistry Officer
Last MOS Group
Dental Corps (Officer)
Last Unit
1968-1968, 3170, 56th Medical Battalion
Service Years
1964 - 1968

Dental Corps

Captain


 Last Photo   Personal Details 


Home State
North Dakota
North Dakota
Year of Birth
1941
 
Casualty Info
Home Town
Grand Forks
Last Address
Grand Forks

Casualty Date
Oct 03, 1968
 
Cause
Non Hostile- Died Other Causes
Reason
Air Loss, Crash - Land
Location
Thua Thien
Conflict
Vietnam War/Unspecified Operation
Location of Interment
Not Specified
Wall/Plot Coordinates
42W 065

 Official Badges 




 Unofficial Badges 



 Photo Album   (More...


 Ribbon Bar



 
 Unit Assignments
56th Medical Battalion
  1968-1968, 3170, 56th Medical Battalion
 Combat and Operations History
  1968-1968 Vietnam War
 Additional Information
Last Known Activity
Probably one of the greatest fears in Vietnam was to die on the way home.
Time and again there were example after example of how you weren't
really safe until you heard the wheels thump into the wheel wells of the
DC-8 Freedom Bird taking us home.  What follows is our recollections of
that day in 1968, the accident report and the list of all known KIAs from
the National Archives for the First Cavalry Division.


Official Accident Summary:

THE US AIR FORCE C7-A DEPARTED CAMP EVANS AIRFIELD FROM RUNWAY
36. HIS LAST RADIO TRANSMISSION AFTER RECEIVING TOWER CLEARANCE
WAS "ROLLING". THIS AIRCRAFT WAS OBSERVED TO BREAK RIGHT PRIOR TO
REACHING THE END OF THE RUNWAY. HE CONTINUED A CLIMBING TURN TO A
HEADING OF APPROXIMATELY 130 DEGREES. THE CH-47 HELICOPTER HAD
DEPARTED LZ NANCY ONLY A FEW MINUTES BEFORE. IT WAS PROCEEDING
SOUTH ALONG HIGHWAY QL-1, ON A HEADING OF 170 DEGREES, IN A
SHALLOW DESCENT. THIS IS A SCHEDULED DAILY PASSENGER AND MAIL
SHUTTLE AND WOULD HAVE ENTERED TRAFFIC ON A RIGHT BASE LEG FOR
LANDING AT THE CAMP EVANS ASP PAD IS THE REGULAR STOP FOR THIS
SHUTTLE AND IS LOCATED EAST OF THE CENTERLINE OF RUNWAY 36,
APPROXIMATELY 1000 FEET SOUTH OF THE APPROACH END OF THAT RUNWAY.
HE HAD NOT YET CALLED THE TOWER FOR CLEARANCE, THOUGH HIS UHF
RADIO WAS ON TOWER FREQUENCY. IT IS ESTIMATED THAT THE CH-47 WAS
CRUISING AT APPROXIMATELY 95 TO 100 KNOTS. THE C7A WITH CLIMB
POWER, SHOULD HAVE BEEN AT ABOUT 105 KNOTS. THE TWO AIRCRAFT
CONVERGED AT AN ALTITUDE OF APPROXIMATELY 1100 FEET AT A RELATIVE
ANGLE OF APPROXIMATELY 40 DEGREES. THE COCKPIT SECTION OF THE
C7-A CONTACTED THE REAR ROTOR OF THE HELICOPTER. THE C7-A HAD
STARTED A RIGHT BANK, PROBABLY A LAST MINUTE ATTEMPT TO AVOID THE
COLLISION. WHEN THE TWO AIRCRAFT COLLIDED, AT LEAST ONE OF THE
HELICOPTER REAR ROTOR BLADES SLICED THRU THE COCKPIT SECTION OF
THE AIRPLANE  ON AN ANGLE FROM THE TOP OF THE COPILOTS WINDSHIELD
DOWN TO THE BOTTOM OF THE PILOTS WINDSHIELD, KILLING BOTH PILOTS
INSTANTLY, AND DESTROYING ALL ENGINE CONTROLS. AT THE SAME TIME,
ONE OF THE ROTOR BLADES, OR DEBRIS FROM THE COCKPIT STRUCK THE
LEFT PROPELLOR OF THE C7-A. ONE OF THE BLADES WAS SEVERED FROM
THE PROPELLER, AND PASSED THROUGH BOTH SIDES OF THE FUSELAGE OF
THE AIRPLANE. THE LEFT PROPELLER THEN SEPARATED FROM THE ENGINE
AND FELL TO THE GROUND. THE C7-A MADE A STEEP DESCENDING RIGHT
TURN AND STRUCK THE GROUND ON A HEADING OF 340 DEGREES. THE
AIRCRAFT DISINTEGRATED, ALL PERSONNEL ABOARD PERISHED, THERE WAS
NO FIRE. THE CH-47, AT THE MOMENT OF THE COLLISION LOST ALL OF
ITS REAR MAIN ROTOR BLADES. ONCE THESE BLADES WERE BROKEN AND
DISTORED BY THE COLLISION, THEY CHOPPED INTO THE TOP OF THE
HELICOPTERS FUSELAGE BEFORE FINALLY SEPARATING FROM THE HUB. THEY
DISLODGED TWO SECTIONS OF THE SYNCHRONIZER DRIVE SHAFT WHICH ALSO
FELL TO THE GROUND. AT THIS TIME, NEITHER ROTOR SYSTEM COULD
PROVIDE ANY THRUST, AND THE HELICOPTER BECAME A FREE FALLING
BODY. WHILE IT WAS TUMBLING TO EARTH, THE REAR ROTOR MAST AND
PYLON SEPARATED FROM THE FUSELAGE AND LANDED 150 METERS SHORT OF
THE FUSELAGE. THE FUSELAGE TUMBLED TO EARTH AND IMPACTED ON A
HEADING OF APPROXIMATELY 120 DEGREES. IT LANDED ON ITS TOP LEFT
SIDE IN A NOSE HIGH ATTITUDE, WITH NEAR ZERO FORWARD SPEED. IT
EXPLODED ON IMPACT. TWO PERSONS FELL OUT OF THE HELICOPTER AS IT
TUMBLED THRU THE AIR. THEY WERE FATALLY INJURED ON CONTACT WITH
THE GROUND. THOSE REMAINING IN THE HELICOPTER DIED IN THE
CRASH.\\


Information on U.S. Army helicopter        tail number 66-19041
Date: 681003
Incident number: 681003141ACD Accident case number: 681003141 Total loss
or fatality Accident
Unit: A/ 228 Combat Support Aviation Battalion  1st  Cavalry Division, 
Phu Bai             Province,
Number killed in accident: 11 Injured: 0 Passengers: 6
Crew Members:
AC W2  JOHNSON THOMAS EUGENE   KIA     
P W1  CONROY RONALD LEE             KIA
FE E4 COSTLEY LARRY L KIA
CE E4  PIERCE JERRY LEE JR           KIA
G E4  REESE DENNIS DEAN              KIA

Passengers from the aircraft accident list are:
CPT ALDERSON THOMAS EARL,
SFC CLEMENTS DAWSON,
SSG YOUNG WILLIAM RANDOLPH,
PFC LUCIER JOHN WILLIAM,
SSG WALLACE CHARLES JAMES,
SP4 SEE MICHAEL DUANE,
   
Comments/Citation


 

Let us not forget Captain Thomas Earl Alderson, casualty of the Vietnam War. As a member of the Army Reserve, CPT Alderson served our country until October 3rd, 1968 in Thua Thien, South Vietnam. He was 26 years old and was married. Thomas died when his helicopter crashed into the land. His body was recovered. Thomas was born on October 9th, 1941 in Grand Forks, North Dakota.

CPT Alderson is on panel 42W, line 065 of the Vietnam Memorial Wall in Washington D.C. He served our country for 4 years.

   
 Military Association Memberships
Vietnam Veterans Memorial
  2012, Vietnam Veterans Memorial [Verified] - Assoc. Page
Copyright Togetherweserved.com Inc 2003-2011